Sunday, March 19, 2017

HUMOR, HOMAGE AND HUMILIATE: EXPLAINING & DIFFERENTIATING BETWEEN LITERARY INTENTIONS

Ever since Alanis Morissette released her song "Ironic," people have started buzzing about the true
meaning of certain literary terms and whether or not they are truly being used properly in context.
Irony confuses, and like the two p's and satire, which will be addressed momentarily, it depends somewhat on the intention of the writer or speaker.

Irony requires an opposing meaning between what's said and what's intended.  Stop.  Think about that for a long moment.  Even the definition is somewhat head scratching, so if you often find yourself confused by irony, you're in excellent company.  One of the confounding factors of irony isn't just that its definition is a bit, well, complex, but also the sheer number of possibilities for correct usage.  It's bad enough that irony is hard to grasp, but now add to that fact that there are, in fact, a multitude of definitions for different forms of irony, including verbal, dramatic, and cosmic. The sheer plethora of ways ironic can be used meaningfully suggests that is something of a "catch all" for a situation that seems odd, upsetting or amusing.  Enter Ms. Morissette...

If it rains on your wedding day, that may be seen as a coincidence, but not irony.  However, if you moved your wedding to an indoor venue because the forecast predicted rain, but the day turned out to be sunny, and then the sprinkler system at your venue malfunctioned and doused the ceremony with water, so you all get wet, after all, THAT'S ironic.  If you win the lottery and drop dead before claiming the money, that is simply good luck followed by bad luck.  If you meet the man of your dreams and then meet his beautiful wife, that's just a bummer.  But if, then, a song called "Ironic" contains no irony, is that in and of itself ironic?  Nope...not really.  It may just be an example of ignorance.  It depends on the creator's intent.  So if Alanis purposely wrote a song about irony with no ironic content at all, is THAT ironic?  We are getting closer....

Here are six ways to look at Irony:

1.  VERBAL IRONY:  when a speaker or writer is intentionally using words that literally convey the opposite of their true beliefs, generally for comic emphasis (sarcasm).  In fact, there is a strong overlap between sarcasm and comic irony.  Example:  Saying "Oh, that's just fantastic," when the situation is really poor.  OR Dimmesdale's sermons about how sinful he is, and how he deserves disgust resulting in the congregation loving him and following him even more.

2.  SITUATIONAL IRONY:  A sharp divergence between expectations or perceptions and reality.  Expectations, of course, often differ from results, but to rise to the state of irony, the gulf between them should be vast and the contrast sharp.  See the wedding example above with Ms. Morissette's song breakdown.

3.  DRAMATIC IRONY:  Perhaps the easiest to understand as its use is so specialized.  The device in which the reader or audience is tipped off to a crucial fact still unknown to one or more of the characters.  Example:  The audience and friar know that Juliet isn't really dead, but Romeo doesn't.


4.  COSMIC IRONY:  Not very often used.  It denotes the idea that the fates are against us, if not indifferent to us, and that our struggles are the result of higher forces amusing themselves at our expense.  Example:  The owner declared of the Titanic, "God, Himself, cannot sink this ship."  Well, you can infer the rest.

5.  HISTORICAL IRONY:  Some things become ironic with time.  If the passage of years creates an amusing juxtaposition between a historical event or claim and what has happened since to contradict it.  Example:  Isn't it ironic that the inventor of the machine gun thought his new weapon would end war?"  Answer:  YES! It is, in fact, historically ironic. :)

6.  SOCRATIC IRONY:  The pretense of ignorance used to draw an opponent into slipping up or revealing flaws in their argument.  Example:  She used socratic questioning in order to poke holes in his emphatic argument.

How's that for confusing?  If that isn't enough, irony is only one way to bring in humor or thought-provoking elements in literature.  There are also parody, pastiche and satire....Buckle up, here we go!

PARODY:  An imitative work created to mock, comment on or trivialize an original work, its subject author, style or some other target, by means of imitation. Example:  The movie "Airplane" is a parody of 1970's disaster movies.  AND Most everything created by Weird Al Yankovic.

PASTICHE:  A work of visual art, literature, or music that imitates the style or character of the work of one or more other artists.  Unlike parody, the intention of pastiche is to celebrate rather than mock. Example:  Many modern artists seek to produce works of impressionism in homage to Renoir and Monet, who are very much beloved.

SATIRE:  A genre of literature and art in which the vices, follies, abuses and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations or society, itself, into improvement.  Although funny, its intention is to shame or offer constructive social criticism.  Examples:  The Daily Show, most political cartoons

Just for fun, the definition of cynicism, or cynical, is an inclination to believe that people are motivated purely by self-interest.  It is a form of skepticism that often leads to the production of satire.

There you have it!  Here's to understanding the various ways authors, speakers, poets and artists humor us, pay homage to us, and humiliate us in all sorts of creative and confounding ways!

I have attached the Morissette song for you to evaluate, armed with your new knowledge of irony.  I have also attached two very funny little videos for your enjoyment.  Reply with the following:

1.  Did you find any examples of true irony in the Morissette song?  Give me an example of irony in something you have heard or read.  What type of irony is it?  Why?


2. What are each of the funny little videos an example of and why?

3.  Which of the previous definitions confused you the most?  What literary device do you find most confusing?

Alanis Morissette:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jne9t8sHpUc
Tim Hawkins Video #1:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5R8gSgedh4
Tim Hawkins Video #2:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LO2eh6f5Go0



79 comments:

  1. 1. In the Morissette song there were a few examples of true irony, but not as much as it was intended. An example includes, "its a free ride when you have already paid". In the movie "Titanic" as well as the true, historical event, the ship was believed to be 100% unsinkable, but in cosmic irony, the ship sank when it hit an iceberg.
    2. The first video is an example of Pastiche irony. This is Parody because they are creating songs for kids but playing them in the melody of songs parents love. For example, they played "Itsy Bitsy Spider" in a melody from cold play, essentially making it a parody.The second video is an example of cosmic irony. We know this because of the line "we can take your money, and do whatever you want" but then contrasting it to "we can give you free college". This is essentially saying that the government can put off a generous appearance making the public think they are getting whatever they want for free, but in actuality the government is demanding money for the things they want.
    3. The definition that confused me the most was pastiche. Perhaps I was most confused because of the confusing name.

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  2. The Alanis Morissette song does not really have irony specifically, but there is one part that could briefly be described as situational irony: “Well life has a funny way of sneaking up on you/ When you think everything's okay and everything's going right/ And life has a funny way of helping you out when/ You think everything's gone wrong and everything blows up/ In your face” This, if dramatic and contrasting enough, could be situational irony due to the difference between expectation and reality.

    The first video is a parody because it is making fun of kids’ songs and how annoying they are to parents by coming up with a fake product called Kids’ Rock, where the music is sung by artists the parents like to make it more tolerable. (hilarious video by the way, loved it). The second video was displaying satire because it was ridiculing the government.

    The definition that confused me the most was cosmic irony. I had to read it at least six times to grasp it. This type of irony seems very difficult to think of examples for, and I can understand why it’s not very often used. However, I think I may have an example for it. Reading the definition, “It denotes the idea that the fates are against us, if not indifferent to us, and that our struggles are the result of higher forces amusing themselves at our expense”, it made a Twenty One Pilots song titled “Isle of Flightless Birds” pop into my head. The song opens with these lyrics: “Now is the climax to the story/ That gives the demons and angels purpose/ They fly around while we are walking/ And mold our emotions just to please them”. I’m pretty sure these lyrics are an instance of cosmic irony because the demons and angels are amusing themselves at our expense, flying around and molding our emotions while we just walk around and take it. They seem indifferent to us humans in the song.

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    1. I love that video, too. Makes me laugh every time. Correct on all fronts. There are no true examples of irony in the song, unless you really assume a context. I do agree on your example of "Life has a funny way ..." and Gabi's point of the verbal irony (sarcasm) when she says, "Well, isn't that nice" in the song (the section about the man whose plane went down.)

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  3. . Did you find any examples of true irony in the Morissette song? Give me an example of irony in something you have heard or read. What type of irony is it? Why?

    It's interesting how the song is called "Ironic" with very little irony in the song. Most of it is just a bad situation like a "black fly in your chardonnay" that's bad luck. Personally, I don't really see any true irony in the song, just things that can really be avoided. If there is a no smoking sign on your smoking break, then maybe it's time to quit?

    2. What are each of the funny little videos an example of and why?

    The first video is an example of parody irony, because it is making fun of kids songs as well as adult bands by impersonating them. The second video is a clear example of satire irony, because it isn't really making fun of the government, more pointing at all the wrong things with it.

    3. Which of the previous definitions confused you the most? What literary device do you find most confusing?

    I found cosmic irony a little confusing at first, because (as you mentioned)it is very uncommon, but it's used. I didn't know that it was something that had a name. But I suppose that all phrases would be some kind of literary device. It's just interesting to know.

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    1. I agree...cosmic irony sounds weird, but because it is so specific, it is, actually, easy to identify when you hear it.

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  4. 1.) Within the song "Ironic", I don't see any true examples of irony. I do see, however, many coincidences that may result in verbal irony. A general example of irony I have heard is very blatant sarcasm. I grew up around an intense amount of sarcasm from my mother, which passed to me and the rest of my siblings. We all speak fluent verbal irony now.

    2.) The first video is a parody, as the creator is making fun of what can be assumed is Kids Bop. The second video, however, was showing satire. The creator pointed out in an obvious fashion the issues with the government.

    3.) Pastiche confuses me the most because it is so similar to a parody. While I understand that a pastiche is in place more so to celebrate than to mock, I don't think I could differentiate them if asked.

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    1. Those two types of literary techniques are very close, that is true!

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  5. 1. I didn't see any true irony in the sing titles "Ironic", but i did see phrases that could fall under the category of verbal irony.

    2. The first song is parody irony because it's adults impersonating Kids Bop. The second song is satire irony because it points out all the wrongs in the government.

    3.I am confused most by Pastiche because its so closely related to parody, and the word doesn't clearly point at what it really is.

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  6. 1. The song doesn't display any true irony. It is more of coincidence or being in the wrong place at the wrong time with a stroke of bad luck.
    2. The first song is parody because of the way it makes fun of what is assumed to be "Kid's Bop" as well as known artists and bands. the second video is satire because of the use of song to point out the faults of our government using a song.
    3. Cosmic irony is confusing to me because I haven't really seen it so I'm not sure if I would be able to identify it if I ever did see it.

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  7. 1) I didn't see any examples of irony in the song "Ironic", though some of the lines could have possibly been situational irony if we had more context.

    2) The first song was a parody because it is imitating (badly) kids bop, as well as poking fun at the bands singing the kids songs.The second song is satire, we know this because the singer is poking fun at all of the faults of the government.

    3) The definition that confused me the most was Socratic irony, I have never seen it before and I didn't really understand the example.

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    1. Here is a more detailed example of socratic irony: admission of your own ignorance and willingness to learn while exposing someone's inconsistencies by close questioning. Thus, while you have said you wish to learn more, while questioning someone else with the purpose of learning, you expose their ignorance. Does that help? Sarah McBride's example is spot on.

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  8. 1. In the song "Ironic" is was difficult to detect if there was any irony present in the song. However there may have been some possible verbal irony. For example, "Well, isn't this nice.". This is a sarcastic line because the previous line talks about how he is thinking that as the plane crashes.

    2. The first song is an example of parody irony because the song is poking fun at Kids Bop. For the second second it was an example of satire irony because of how it highlights the wrongs in the government.

    3. The term that confuses me the most out of the different types of irony is "Cosmic Irony". Perhaps it is because I have not seen much of this, or if I did, I was unaware of it.

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    1. Yes - very good catch on the "Isn't this nice." Really the only clear example of irony in the song.

      It would just be parody and satire. They are not actually types of irony, just literary techniques.

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  9. 1. I didn't quite see any true irony in the song "Irony" by Alanis Morissette. I mostly saw that it was a bad situation that could be avoided, yet some of the phrases did seem as if they could be interpreted as verbal irony.

    2. The first video is an example of a parody because it is making fun of Kids Bop. The second example is satire because it point out all the issues with the government.

    3. The most confusing literary device for me was pastiche because it is almost the same as parody, and the name "pastiche" just doesn't help identify its meaning.

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  10. 1. I didn't notice any true irony in the Morissette song, though some of the situations mentioned would be if they had more opposite details involved. An example of irony that I have heard is, "A traffic cop has his license suspended for unpaid parking tickets," which is an example of situational irony because you wouldn't expect the TRAFFIC COP to lose his license because of PARKING TICKETS.

    2. The first video is an example of a parody, making fun of kids bop and what they do with new songs that have come out; the second video is an example of satire because it is pointing out flaws with the government in a comedic but critical way, shaming the actions of the government.

    3. The situational irony confused me the most because I wasn't sure how much detail warranted a situation to be able to be referred to as situational irony, and how little would prevent it from being called so. I find irony rather confusing, I'm unsure whether or not I should try to point out irony in situations, for fear that I would be wrong.

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    1. Excellent example of situational irony! Situational irony is the most confusing to people - including Alanis Morissette.

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  11. 1. There was very little irony found in the Morissette song. It was more about bad situations that could or have occurred. This could be situational irony but it depends on how someone interprets it.

    2.The first video is a parody since it is making fun of kids bop. They imitate the style as well as adding on bad mspaint art along with the songs. The second one is satire since it is shaming the government in a comedic and catchy way.

    3. I find irony really confusing, especially when trying to differentiate between all of them. But the one I'm confused about the most is cosmic irony since it isn't used as much and I don't tend to hear it often.

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  12. 1. There was maybe only a little bit of irony in the Morissete song. The situations described could be taken as ironic by some, but they're very basic examples and to be taken as ironic you'd have to go deeper into it.

    2. The first one was definitely a parody as it played off of kids bop and made fun of it, while the second one is satire making fun of the government.

    3.Pastiche was the one that confused me the most. It seemed a little different from the rest of the definitions dealing with art and such, and I feel that you don't hear about it as often.

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  13. No, I could not find any examples of irony in the song “Irony”. Maybe if the artist explained more the meaning behind her lyrics it might have been examples of irony.
    The first song is parody because it was just making fun of artist with kid songs.Satire is the second song because the singer is making fun of government.
    I feel that the definition that confuses me the most is all of them because I more example or see them in play to understand them better.

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  14. 1. I didn't find any true irony in the Morrisette song. One of the longer lines came close, but when I looked back at the definitions, it wasn't ironic. An ironic situation occurred in The Two sisters of Bamarre by Gail Carson Levine. *Spoilers ahead* It's kind of a bit of verbal and situational irony (with a separate cosmic irony incident which would take too long to explain). There are two sisters, Addie the weak and Meryl the strong. Their entire life they play games where Addie contracts the Grey Death (the only thing she isn't afraid of, feeling she can conquer her own body) and Meryl fights valiantly to find a cure. Instead, Meryl comes down with the Grey Death and admits that it was her only fear, because she couldn't physically fight it. Addie the weak fights dragons and monsters, conquering her fears and saving the entire kingdom from the disease, except for her sister. And maybe this isn't quite irony, but between the role reversal and the fact that she was SO close, it was ironic to me.
    2. The first video was definitely a parody. I liked how instead of bringing adult music to kids, they brought kids' music to adults. The second video was a satire, seeking to bring about change in the tax system. I liked both of the videos equally. I liked individual songs in the first video, but not the commercial itself. I liked the energy and sound of the second one, but I am so sick of politics.
    3. I don't know why there are so many forms of irony. I just want to be like Morrisette and say "That's ironic" and be done with it. (Whether or not it's proper.)

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  15. 1. I could not find any examples of true irony in the song Ironic by Alanis Morissette. The song was more about unfortunate events that have happened in people’s lives. An example of irony that I have seen in literature is in The Wizard of Oz. Dorothy gets whisked away by a tornado, and spends the whole book trying to do everything in her power to get back home. In the end, we learn that everything was just a dream and that she was home the whole time.
    2. The first video is an example of a parody. This is shown, because it is making fun of Kid’s Bop and other well known musicians. The second video is an example of satire, because it points out what is wrong with the government and ridicules it.
    3. The term that confused me the most was socratic irony, because I do not really understand how you would use it in everyday use.

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    1. See above in Mable's entry - it is so specific, you would probably know it when you saw it. :)

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  16. 1. I did not find any true examples of irony in Morissette's song. It is all unfortunate situations, but none of them are ironic. Before reading this blog post, however, I probably would have mistaken parts of the song for irony, as irony has always confused me. While I cannot think of a specific instance of irony, I feel like I've seen a movie or read a book where a character has died and the audience has been informed, but another character does not yet know this and is anticipating the reuinion. This would be dramatic irony because the audience is aware of something that another character is not.

    2. Both videos are parodies on different songs and are meant for entertainment and laughs. The second video, however, is also critiquing the government, and could therefore be seen as a satire.

    3. Irony as a whole kind of confuses me, though I've been taught some of the types of irony before, so certain ones, such as dramatic irony, make more sense. I had never before heard of cosmic or historical irony, though they both make sense. I'm not sure I could come up with an example for either of them, though. . . I also had never heard of Socratic Irony, which to me just sounds like the Socratic Method and it's hard for me to see what makes this ironic.

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  17. Because my original writing didn't post for whatever reason, I have to redo it so I'll make it quicker and simpler.

    The song didn't have any examples of true irony, merely just unfortunate events that at some points involved bad luck.
    However in the comments below the video I found a true example of irony, specifically situational irony:
    Mr. Play it safe was afraid to drive
    He packed his suitcase and decided to fly.
    He wanted to drive, but couldn't find his voice
    And as the plane crashed down, he thought "This was an excellent choice."
    This is situational irony because it's not just a mere coincidence or unfortunate event, it involves contradictions and greater complexities than a simple of event of misfortune.

    The first video was an example of a parody as they were remaking regular songs to fit kids songs and lyrics. It was more for comedy then for it to be acknowledged as a work inspired by another's.
    The second video is an example of satire because it made fun of something while also giving feedback into what's wrong about it and what could be fixed.

    Situational irony is the most confusing form of them all because it requires a greater complexity and analyzation of thought then what it's normally misconstrued to be, like with simpler examples like those in the song "Ironic". These greater complexities and mixtures of intent and contradictions make for a simply more engaging and stimulating form of irony that takes more brain power to analyze compared to the rest in order to understand it.

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    1. While I love your lyrics for Mr. Play it safe, he is actually afraid to fly. He packed his suitcase and kissed his kids goodbye. He'd waited his whole damn life to take that flight, and as the plane crashed down, he thought, "Well, isn't this nice." (an example of verbal irony). :)

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  18. 1) There were no true signs of irony throughout the song just coincidences that are very unfortunate in an almost comedic way. One sign of irony I see consistently is verbal irony though the sarcasm of others on a daily basis, as people will say some things while feeling the complete opposite way as a joke.

    2) The first video would be a pastiche as it is taking the style of the artist and imitating it in a different way. The second was satire as it aimed more to just make fun of a general topic.

    One of the hardest for me to recognize Historical Irony as it calls for a historical understanding and knowledge to find the humor in it.

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  19. I didn't find any examples of true irony within the song. It seemed more like good luck versus bad luck. Before learning about the different types of irony, I would have described a few lines in the song as being ironic. For example when she says, "He won the lottery and died the next day”, I would have thought this to be ironic.

    The first video was definitely an example of a parody. It is making fun of the brand Kid Bop. I also thought this video was hilarious!
    The second video is an example of satire because it highlights issues in the government.

    I am really confused by the cosmic irony. I understand the example, but I feel like I would have a hard time identifying that type of irony within literature.

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    1. You may not have as hard a time as you think. It is so specific, you sort of know it when you see it. :)

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  20. 1. I found no examples of true irony in the Morissette song. They were all just odd events. A type of irony I have experienced is verbal irony. I see it in everyday of my life when I'm sarcastic. It is irony because I say one thing but mean the opposite. For example when my sibling says anything dumb I say "Well aren't you just so smart!"

    2. The first funny video was a form of parody as it mocked the idea of kid's bop. The second video was a form of satire as it was used to criticism the government and point out it's flaws.

    3. Historical irony confuses my the most out of all of these. I understood the example, but not the definition itself to the point I could provide another example of my own. The literary devices made sense to me and I don't think I have a problem with them.

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  21. 1. The song did not show very much irony, rather coincidence. I absolutely love this song!
    2. The first song is mocking Kids Bop as it played Coldplay, but it was a terrible version of Itsy Bitsy Spider. In the second video, it is satire because Tim is making fun of the government of how they do their tasks in benifiting them and it takes away from the public.
    3. I am still confused on the cosmic irony because I haven't really seen it as often as other types of irony as much.

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  23. I am sorry, my original post had an grammatical error in it!

    I did not find any examples of irony in Alanis Morissette's song, more so I found coincidences that turned out to be unfortunate situations. However the song was still interesting and still gave that "oh wow" feeling that ironic situations can give. In terms of irony I have seen personally, there is a song that I have listened to recently by Notorious B.I.G. that I believe shows historical irony. In the song, he says "reminisce on dead friends too/you're nobody til' somebody kills you". These lyrics are ironic because sadly a few years after Notorious B.I.G. released this song, he was killed, and his death has contributed to his increased recognition by others. His death along with his great talent has made him one of the most iconic hip hop artists there has been. Although it was unpredictable, it seemed as if his lyrics ended up applying to himself years after he rapped them.

    The first video was a parody on the company "Kidz Bop". The video copied the brand's advertisement style and the types of products they make (kid friendly versions of popular songs and artists). The second video was a satire, as it used a common song to immensely criticize and "call out" the United States government and their actions.

    Out of all of the definitions, the definition I found the most difficult to understand was Socratic irony. The example was helpful for my understanding, and I think looking at more examples will help solidify my understanding of the concept more. A literary device I find a bit confusing is paradoxes, most likely do to the fact that I do not often spot them (easily at least) in literature or use them frequently myself.

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    1. WOW! What a very sad situation with the rap artist. Very weird AND ironic (situationally) that his own lyrics ended up applying to his actual situation.
      Totally agree - a paradox is a VERY hard thing to define. We need to have a post dedicated to the difference between oxymoron and paradox - that can be tough, too.

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  24. Throughout the song, Ironic by Morissette, I found very little examples of irony. Although there were examples of situational irony: the wedding.

    The first video is an example of a parody. The author of the video mocking an original work to be humorous.

    The second video is an example of a satire. The author was shaming individuals/society into improvement.

    The definition that confused me the most was cosmic irony because it was not common to me to hear of.

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    1. Well, the wedding example would be right, if Alanis had laid it out like my example above, but she didn't. Just rain on your wedding day by itself is just bad luck, (or, as the Irish, English and Scottish believe, good luck) not really irony.

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  25. There aren't really any ironic things in the Morissette song. The song focused more on just bad luck. An example of irony that I have experienced would probably be those times when I got some scissors from Wal-Mart and it had some intense packaging and I basically ended up needing my scissors to open up my scissors.

    The first video basically just made fun of kids songs by having well known bands imitate them. The second video was a song disrespecting and exposing everything wrong with our government.

    I used to have the hardest time trying to wrap my head around idioms when I was younger. I was a very literal person and I need someone to explain to me what it means when someone says that it's "raining cats and dogs"

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  26. 1. Did you find any examples of true irony in the Morissette song? Give me an example of irony in something you have heard or read. What type of irony is it? Why?
    Although all the definitions of irony still confuses me, the song is called "Ironic" definitely doesn't have any true irony in it. Most of it is just bad luck or coincidences, but of course I still have to appreciate the song and give it credit for being very '90s and very catchy. Most of the irony I hear in my life is from myself using sarcasm on a daily basis.


    2. What are each of the funny little videos an example of and why?
    The first video is an example of parody irony, by it is making fun of Kidz Bop which uses kids covers of popular songs. The second video is an example of satire irony, by pointing out the governments flaws and issues.


    3. Which of the previous definitions confused you the most? What literary device do you find most confusing?
    I found cosmic irony to be the most confusing as I haven't really been exposed to it as much as I have been exposed to the other forms of irony.

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  27. 1. Did you find any examples of true irony in the Morissette song? Give me an example of irony in something you have heard or read. What type of irony is it? Why?

    Actually, I did find an example of something I thought was truly ironic. In the song, she sings, "Mr. Play It Safe was afraid to fly. He packed his suitcase and kissed his kids goodbye. He waited his whole life to take that flight. And as the plane crashed down he thought, 'Well isn't this nice...'" I believe this is an example of verbal irony, because what he obviously thinks is that the situation he's in is indeed _not_ nice. His plane is crashing and he's likely not stoked that he might die.
    An example of irony in something I've heard read once was when I was on a slow-moving water-ride at a theme park, and all of a sudden all of the boat-carts began piling up, and I heard someone say, "Well isn't this just _great_?" And I knew they were using verbal irony because obviously most people would think that being on a broken ride is not the best situation to be in.

    2. What are each of the funny little videos an example of and why?

    Tim Hawkins Video number 1 is an example of a parody because `they are nursery rhymes/songs that are remade keeping adult audiences in mine, therefore making it a comedy. Furthermore, this video did not have any malicious intent to it, not making it a satire. Tim Hawkins Video number 2 is an example of satire because it is a political commentary on liberalism and the expansion of government, yet still being comedic in its fashion. The intent of that video was to criticize society and the government.

    3. Which of the previous definitions confused you the most? What literary device do you find most confusing?

    The previous definition that confuses me the most is probably that of Socratic irony. Although I generally understand what it means, it is probably the definition I'm most iffy grasping. I would need to see a true example of this type of irony played out to completely understand it. I think the most confusing literary device for me is probably verbal irony, also known as sarcasm. If you knew me, you would know that I am the worst at interpreting and deciphering spoken sarcasm for reasons I still don't know.

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  28. 1) One example of actual irony in the song "Ironic" can actually be found in the lines, "And as the plane crashed down he thought/'Well, isn't this nice.'", where 'Mr. Play It Safe' can be found demonstrating verbal (or in this case, mental) irony in his remark regarding the, in fact, unpleasant situation he has found himself in. On a somewhat related note, perhaps it is situational irony that "Ironic" was one of my favorite songs to sing with my mother as a child (and even during housekeeping days now in my teens), yet despite my attention to the song and repeated practice, I cannot recognize the phrases Ms. Morissette is singing?

    2) Well, the first video was a blatant parody, what with its mimicry of modern artists as it mocks and trivializes not only children's music, but the brand 'Kidz Bop' and remakes in general. The second one seems to be more the work of satire, as the content ridicules the American governmental system in a musical shaming form of criticism. Alternatively, this could also be an example of parody as Mr. Hawkins' song playfully trivializes ongoing political issues in lyrical form while taking direction from the song "The Candyman Can".

    3) Of the forms of irony presented, I believe situational irony was the most difficult to comprehend, simply because so many seemingly random instances are assumed to be ironic in this sense, but must actually fall under more strict criteria than the would-be 'authors' assume. Overall, I found that the most challenging aspect of irony is determining whether something can really even be considered ironic, due to the wide variety of types and regulations. One could say that using socratic irony can be used to question and doubt the irony of any given example!

    "Humor is everywhere, in that there's irony in just about anything that a human does." ~Bill Nye [the Science Guy]

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    1. I completely agree....it is situational irony that seems to have Ms. Morissette (and most of us!) confused!

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  29. I think that the song itself is ironic because the writer stated that it was ironic and took up the entire song to give examples of irony which ended up being incorrect. One episode of Criminal Minds showed the BAU interrogating the husband of the victim and they stated that she had been hit in the head multiple times and finally the man asked if they had found the brick even though they had not said brick. This is an example of Socratic Irony because they used their "lack" of knowledge to make the killer slip up in his information.

    I believe the first video is a parody because it makes fun of how parents dont like children's songs, compares the artists to children's writers, and makes fun of their voices. I think the second is satire because it prods at the government stating that they can take our money, undermine the constitution, and benefit themselves and make it seem perfectly fine to a tune that many people know and love.

    Cosmic Irony confuses me the most and I find that euphemisms are the most difficult for me to grasp.

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    1. Good analysis of the Tim Hawkins satire, and nice example of socratic irony!

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  30. 1. Within the song I don't feel as if I found any real, true irony. However with that said, I think I found a little cosmic irony within the song. From my vague understanding of these different types, I think that what was really listed in the songs were more bad luck, or coincidences.

    2.The first video, is a parody. They are making fun of Kids Bop, and how annoying it can be to parents. This actually made me laugh out loud. When I was younger, and Kids Bop had just begun, parents LOVED it, and swore that it was better fitting for their innocent children, even though the children hated it. Now, I think everyone just hates it. The second I see as Satire. This is because while it is almost poking at the government, and saying all the things wrong they have done, I don't think its meant to be as a parody.

    3. Pistache is still a bit confusing to me. It said the parody is made to celebrate not mock, is this more like a backhanded compliment? Almost like bashing something while admiring it as well?

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    1. Actually, you have that last part reversed. Parody is meant to make something playful and funny and pastische is meant to honor the piece it is copying. It has no intention of making any sort of fun out of it. Think of it as the difference between an Al Yankovic song (parody) and a student copying the style of Renoir in a painting. (pastische).

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  31. In the song, one of the few examples of "true" irony I found was Dramatic Irony in the lines about meeting "the love of your life and then meeting his wife". In this case, the person, assuming it's Alanis, doesn't know he has a wife, when the husband/wife both know of their marriage (I hope). Even that's a stretch from the true definition of irony. I guess in my own life I have very many instances of Historical Irony. The primary one that comes to mind was my previous statements of never wanting to have long hair again that I spoke a few years back, and now I'm forced to keep my hair long because of allergies.
    The first video, "Kid Rock" is an instance of pastiche because the children's songs are in the style of newer artists, mimicking their style. The second video however, "The Government Can" is a true instance of both parody and satire because it's openly mocking the government (satire) as well as using a style negatively (parody).
    I think this goes outside the realm of literary techniques, but I find identifying themes within a piece of literature the hardest to do. Usually I can comprehend the text, but connecting all of the central ideas is a struggle for me. The device on this list that confused me the most, however, was the instance of Socratic Irony just because it's unfamiliar. I've heard of all the other types before in previous classes, but never Socratic Irony.

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    1. Parody isn't really intending to use anything negatively, it's really just playing with something for fun--with no malevolent intent.

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  32. I was not able to find any true irony in the Alanis Morissette song. I have however, found irony in a roadside sign. The sign was an advertisement for a phone company and it read" Phone out of service? Give us a call!"

    The first video is an example of parody. It is a recreation of a commercial for something like Kidz Bop, but it is completely fictional and only exists for comedic purposes.

    The second video is a clear example of Satire. It was making fun of a real world problem. It was also sort of a parody because the song itself and the melody was based on "The Candy man can" from Willy Wonka and the chocolate factory.

    Socratic Irony is the most confusing to me because it is so specific and focused on one situation.

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  33. 1. Did you find any examples of true irony in the Morissette song? Give me an example of irony in something you have heard or read. What type of irony is it? Why?
    In Morissette’s song “Ironic”, a none of this is truly ironic, it’s all just a series of bummer’s that are happening to her. An example of something that I think is very ironic is someone wishing and not wanting to get a divorce their whole life, but do later on because the husband was cheating on her. I think that this is a type of cosmic irony, because it seems that the fate of her wishes to always be together may not go in your favor, no matter how perfect you act.

    2. What are each of the funny little videos an example of and why?
    The first funny video seemed to be like a parody because it was basically making fun of both adult bands and kid songs by mashing them together. Also it was pastiche since it was incorporating the making fun of music.
    The second video is a satire because it is making fun of and shaming the corporation, which is our government.
    3. Which of the previous definitions confused you the most? What literary device do you find most confusing?
    The pastiche, satire, and parody are pretty easy for me to understand. The hardest is all of the different types of irony.

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    1. Nice way of interpreting cosmic irony in that situation! Yes, in context, that is correct. :)

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  34. 1. In the song, 'Ironic', I didn't seem to indentify any true irony in it, besides the situational irony of what occured such as, "winning the lottery and dying the next day", "rain on your wedding day" or "free ride when you already there" and such. The situations explained in the song are more like having bad luck in a certain situation or making it more of a moot point. As irony is used on a daily basis, most of it that I experience comes from sarcasm. Everyone has sarcastic remarks all the time and I'm well aware of that.

    2. In the other two videos, the first one was more of a parody as it made fun, in a light manner of kids' songs, mostly relating to kids bop and how they try to remake songs for kids. And how it's never really that great so it's something fun to make fun of. In the second video, it's satire since it clearly points out the issues made in the video because of calling out and making the government look shameful.

    3. I think I would find cosmic irony and socratic irony the most confusing out of all the different types since I don't see them being used as often as the rest and so therefore not relaly being exposed to examples of how it really works so I can understand it.

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  35. 1. Ironic had a ironic quote that stood out to me, "He waited his whole life, to take that flight. And as the plane crash down, he thought "Well isn't this nice"." This is Verbal Irony because it convey the opposite of their true belief, very sarcastic, strong sarcasm. I could just imagine a plane going down and a middle age man, yelling "Well isn't this nice!". Which is messed up but comedic in a way.

    2. Each video represents Irony in unique ways. Morissette uses a song that is kinda deep and energetic to encompass a strong meaning to Irony relating it to life. While Tom Hawkins poke fun at life to like government but in more of a comedic way, explaining how the government is suppose to support the citizens but instead they do the opposite. I believe they made these songs to poke fun at all the ironic things in life. It gives a story of how things are meant to be/act in this way but, instead act in the opposite. If you think about, its a good self awareness video.

    3. I think i had the most trouble with Socratic Irony, I would have to look deeper to have a better understanding of it. Maybe watch a video?

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    1. While there is definitely a basis for examining irony in the two videos, I was hoping you would look at which of the techniques (pastiche, satire or parody) you saw in both of them.

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  36. In her song, “Ironic,” Morissette did have one example of verbal irony. In the verse which tells the story of a man too afraid to fly, but eventually did. It states that the man, in a poor situation (falling to his death in a plane) said, “Well isn’t this nice…” It is highly unlikely that the man actually thought the plane crashing was nice or good for him, but instead the opposite of what he actually felt making the statement verbal irony. A few years back I hear some historical/situational irony about the inventor of the cotton gin. The inventor of the cotton gin (similar to the man who invented the machine gun) thought by creating the cotton gin, slaves would not have to work as hard to pick cotton and have a better life. In actuality, it resulted in thousands of slaves working twice as hard as before and picking more crops. It is historical irony because over time it was revealed to historians that this was not the case and labor actually rose due to his invention. It is also situational irony because the expectation of the cotton gin was that it would help slaves, but the reality was the exact opposite. What truly makes it ironic, however, is that it did make it easier for slaves to pick cotton which lead taskmasters to work the slaves harder thereby hurting slaves instead of helping them.

    The first video is an example of parody. It is making fun of several artists and their hit songs, by remaking them into children’s songs thereby mocking them.. The reason it is parody is because not only does it mock original works by taking the same music and turning it into a children’s song, but it also is making the statement that the songs are equivalent of the annoying children’s songs parents must listen to in order to pacify their children. The second video is a satire which borrows the format of a parody in order to criticize the government for taxing the American people on items of necessity in order to pay for their, as the satirist states, “solutions.” It borrows from parody as it redoes an original work, however, the artist's purpose here is not to criticize the original work, but to use it as a means of making government officials feel bad for their actions, the main point of satires.


    Socratic irony confused me the most and is still confusing to me. As a result, I think I will do some more research on it and look at more examples. The literary device I find the most confusing is probably irony. Not because I don’t understand irony, but because pop culture such as Morissette’s song have lead me to believe that certain situations that occur are irony when they are just coincidences or bad luck. Because of this, sometimes I can’t decide if something is truly ironic or if it is just “funny” because one wouldn’t think of it happening and mistakenly called ironic as a result.

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  37. Yes I found true irony in the Masrissette song from the first lines of the song where it says “An old man turned ninety-eight, He won the lottery and died the next day” It is ironic that this old man finally won the lottery but then died the next day. I’ve heard people tell a teacher when we have an essay,“thank you for the essay Mrs. Whatever” this is verbal irony because it used to mean something else.

    The first video was an example of situational irony where the exact opposite of what is meant to happen, happens.
    The second video was an example of Verbal irony where it used words to mean something else


    I got confused with Socratic irony because I dont really understand it and it is a new type of irony that I have never heard about and maybe thats why Im confused with it

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  38. 1 The irony I saw in the song was "meeting the man of my dreams and his beautiful wife". I see that as cosmic irony because she thinks that fate has sent her the man of her dreams but it's not true because he fate already gave him the woman of his dreams

    2 The first video was a pastiche because it's complementing the style of the original music by mimicking it and saying how good it would be if children's songs was like them.
    The second song was a satire because it shines a light on the flaws in the government.

    3 I think the most confusing was irony, mostly because I never knew there was so many types of irony.The only one I think I completely understood was the dramatic irony

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  39. I could find no true evidence of irony in the song but I have seen Irony in an advertisement poster for blind people. This would be considered situational irony.
    The first video was a pastiche because it mimicked the songs and complimented the original while still making fun of it.
    The thing most confusing about irony is trying to figure out what type it is. I have never really been able to memorize the different types of irony.

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  40. 1.) The song by Alanis Morisette is full of irony, which I expected considering the name of the song is "Ironic". Right from the opening there is 'Cosmic Irony' when Alanis says: An old man turned ninety-eight, He won the lottery and died the next day." Assuming one believes in a higher power, it was ironic that the man won the lottery and then God decided that it was his time to go shortly after.

    2.) The video titled: "Kids Rock" was parody of kids bop/children oriented type music. It replicated that music in such a way that was making fun of it. The second Tim Hawkins video was made as a satire on the government. This can be said considering the way that the song called out the government on its shortcomings.

    3.) I found 'Socratic Irony' to be a bit more on the confusing side of understanding. The definition seemed clear enough though I would say the example simply made it more confusing.

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  41. The example of irony that I found was Verbal Irony. "He waited his whole damn life to take that flight, And as the plane crashed down he thought 'Well isn't this nice...'" This is verbal irony because he stated "well isn't this nice" as intended sarcasm.

    The first video - Kid’s Rock- would be a parody because the took rock songs and made a funny cover of children’s songs. The second video - The Government Can- would be a satire because in a way the video is shaming the government in a comical way.

    The definition that confused me the most would be Socratic irony. Which means: The pretense of ignorance used to draw an opponent into slipping up or revealing flaws in their argument. Does that mean a person uses the other person's intelligence against them?

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  42. 1.I couldn’t find any true examples of irony in the song Ironic by Alanis Morissette, the song refers to more of coincidence and bad luck rather than irony for example, winning the lottery and then dying the next day is bad luck. I don’t know if this an example of irony, but I was sitting in my mothers car listening to the radio and a anti-smoking ad played as this woman who was smoking a cigarette passed by, it may be a coincidence?

    2. The first video was an example of parody, the video was mocking Kidzbop. The second video was an example of satire, as the video was using humor to criticize the government.

    3. I really don’t understand cosmic irony because I’ve never really been exposed to this type of irony.

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  43. 1. In the first lines of the song there is situational irony where it says "An old man turned ninety-eight
    He won the lottery and died the next day". This is situational irony because he finally won the lottery but he cannot spend any of it because he died.
    2. The first video is an example of parody because it is mocking a Kidzbop video using rock songs. The second video is an example of satire because it was making fun of the government and all of its problems.
    3. The type of irony that I don't understand very well is cosmic irony just because it is not a type of irony that i have been exposed to in the past.

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  44. The only irony I caught in the song is the sarcastic line, "And as the plane crashed down he thought'Well, isn't this nice'". I did think it was ironic to write a song about some irony, but other than that I didn't think the song had much irony.
    The first video was a parody of Kidz Bop by having kid songs be sung by bands favored by adults instead of the other way around. The second video ridiculed the government through humor, which makes it an example of satire.
    I have trouble understanding Socratic irony because I have never heard of that type of irony or I have not recognized that as irony.

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  45. The most ironic thing that I found in the song is when he said that a man turned 98 and won the lottery and then died the next day because he won all of the money but then did not have any time to use it or enjoy his earnings. The first song was a parody because it is imitating kids bop, and also making fun of the bands singing the kids songs. The second song is satire because the singer is making fun of the faults of the government. I don't really understand why there are different types of irony.

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  46. I thought some situations in the song did in fact show irony in some form. For example, a use of verbal irony in the song is found within the situation of the plane flying as he sarcastically says, " Well, isn't this nice." A man who was scared to fly for years, finally got on a plane which ended up falling out of the sky, one can only imagine that the man was furious at this moment.

    The first video seemed to be that of a parody, a comedy of sorts since it was poking fun while the second video was an example of satire since it was joking around about the government.

    Socratic irony is a bit of a miss for me. I get the jist of it but I'm not exactly sure how to use it and what exactly to be looking for to spot it in literature.

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  47. 1. When I listened to the song I couldn't find any solid ironic evidence but there was hints of some verbal irony when she was talking about the man who never flew and when he did the plane crashed. I have seen a video where there was a statue of an iconic figure and below him in bold, large letters was "Freedom" but in order to preserve the statue the local government had put up glass barriers which makes this situational irony.

    2. The first video is a parody because it is making fun of kids’ songs and using famous bands to do a cover of them to make parents actually like playing them over and over instead of getting annoyed by the old versions. The second video was displaying satire because it was ridiculing the government.

    3. The definition that confused me the most would be the many different types of irony because I would just think it would be all the same but I understood satire, parody etc.

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  48. 1. I found some verbal Irony in the song when the man said "well isn't this nice" when a plane had crashed. That's ironic because it's not nice that the plain crash. His intended meaning is opposite of the word nice.
    2. The first video is parody because it uses the sound of a famous band to play a kids song. Poking fun at the bands sound. The second video is satire because it is commenting on problems our government has.
    3.Socratic irony confused me more than nay of the other ones. I have read, heard of, and even used most of the other ones. But I am not familiar with socratic irony.

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  49. 1) Before reading the article I wasn't aware of how complex irony could be and how many different forms there really were. Therefore, now knowing this I wasn't able to really pinpoint true irony within the song however I do think the section about the plane was if anything, verbal irony. The man had a sense of sarcasm as he thought, "Well, isn't this nice" after he had previously been scared to fly and it had taken him so long to get into the air and now he is going to crash.
    2) The first video would be considered a parody because it's taking songs made by famous/credible artists and reworded them to cater to children. The other video pokes fun of the government and their flaws by comically adding criticism so this would be considered satire.
    3) The form of irony that I found most confusing was probably Socratic irony likely because I don't remember hearing about it. From what I understand the irony seems to have to be between two people as well, which is a little confusing.

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  50. 1. I found through the video that the irony lied within the saying "well isn't this nice." This is seen as irony due to the fact that the plane had crashed and he was afraid of flying in the beginning and this scenario then proves his fear.
    2. The first video appears to be a parody of the videos by kids bop. This is shown through the adults singing for childish songs instead of in kids bop the kids singing more mature songs in a kid like nature. The second video made it clear that it was making fun of the government in a comedic way. This kind of video is an example of satire.
    3. The Socratic irony confused me the most because I was unfamiliar with it and because it was focused on one specific situation. Although the satire, parody, and pastiche types of irony I did understand because I was familiar with them and have seen them used before.

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  51. 1. There wasn't any true examples of irony within the song "ironic," however there were examples of verbal irony.

    2. Parody irony takes place in the first because it is making fun of kids music because it is adults making fun of it. The second video displays satire irony because it is making fun of the government.

    3. Pastiche was a difficult one to understand because it is similar to parody, although it is an interesting concept.

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  52. 1. After looking at the definitions of each type of irony and applying those to the song "Ironic" by Alanis Morissette, there seems to be no examples of true irony. A possible situation where I have seen an example of socratic irony is on Tucker Carlson's news show. He likes to perform that socratic method of questioning against his opponents that eventually cause them to slip up and reveal flaws in their argument. It is really fun/interesting to watch (at least I think so).

    2. The first Tim Hawkins video is an example of a parody because it takes well known songs and replaces them with well known kids music. The second I think is a mixture of satire and parody. It parodies the "Candy Man Song" while using it's own lyrics to make fun of the government.

    3. For me pastiche was a little confusing just because I feel there would be a blurred line in whether some work of art was meant to mock or to celebrate some previous work. I feel it could be a little difficult to identify.

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  53. I did find some examples of irony in her song but most of seemed more like bad luck and coincidence than irony. The easiest for me to recognize was "He waited his whole damn life to take that flight/ And as the plane crashed down he thought/ "Well, isn't this nice."" This one has verbal irony in it because of the man saying "Well, isn't this nice" as the plane he was in crashed. Verbal irony in the form of sarcasm is used everyday in my house. In one of my favorite series, Percy Jackson and the Olympians there was lots of examples of irony but the example I have is ""You weren't able to talk some sense into him?" "Well, we kind of tried to kill each other in a duel to the death." "I see. You tried the diplomatic approach."" This is an example of verbal irony because it takes what really happened and says the opposite but really means the opposite of that.
    1st Parody- It took popular songs and changed the lyrics to relate to popular songs and stories younger children know.
    2nd Satire- It takes the government and mocks it for its "vices, follies, abuses and shortcomings" and tries to shame it.

    I found satire and pastiche the most confusing definitions. I already knew what a parody is and have been watch parodies of things for years. I always thought that things that are categorized as a satire and pastiche were just parodies but now I know they aren't. I'm not exactly sure which literary device is the most confusing to me.

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  54. 1.Looking through the music video I didn't find any evidence of true irony, although they were along the lines of coincidence it didn't quite fit the criteria of irony. My favorite type of irony is Dramatic Irony. It's really easy to spot and figure out. An example of dramatic irony would be in Romeo and Juliet. In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo comes at a moment when he thinks that she is dead. Everyone else knows she's not but Romeo is the only one unaware of this information and kills himself. Seconds later Juliet wakes up and finds Romeo dead and then kills herself as well. Talk about bad timing. Another example would be like in almost every scary movie ever. The protagonist finds him/herself in a scary situation (a scary house maybe), knows that something is off and goes "exploring" and then bad stuff happens. Everyone knows that something bad is going to happen if they go and explore but the character does it anyway.
    Another example of irony would be a fire truck being on fire, which is Situational Irony, also a favorite of mine.
    2. The videos are both examples of Parody. The videos not only make fun of the tunes of these famous songs they also point fun towards little kids nursery rhymes, the Government's taxing system, and the candy man song. It's just to get a little laugh from everyone. (they were pretty funny)
    3. I think the example of irony that confuses me most is Pastiche. Pastiche is kind of like parody but instead of just making fun of it, it just kind of imitates the style and celebrates it. I think It confuses me because it's like parody and I'm so used to hearing and watching examples of parody, Like Weird Al, which speaking of him is where I learned the difference between coincidence and irony from the song "Word Crimes."

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  55. 1. Throughout the video, it was hard to detect any forms of true irony. Most of the events Alanis described were examples of poor situations rather than irony. A song about irony containing no irony is pretty ironic, however. If someone wanted to find a goldmine of true irony, the most recent American election is a great place to look. CNN offers many articles on combating "fake news" (stories presented as fact while being untruth in actuality). This is an example of irony because CNN continues to report about Russians hacking the American election, a notion that has been proven false by many sources. I would say this is situational irony in action because CNN has painted its expectations (fakes news is bad and we are against it) while in reality they contrast themselves by reporting a false story over and over(making them become fake news).

    The first video is an example of pastiche. This is because Tim Hawkings imitates popular music artists and puts his own unique spin on them. This wasn't done as a parody per se because Hawkings isn't mocking or critiquing the original songs rather making them fit into the category of "kid's rock).

    The second song is an example of satire. Tim is ridiculing the US government by altering the song "The Candy Man" to describe the government as thieves, liars, and crooks.

    I found dramatic irony to be the most confusing definition before today. It was difficult to find examples of but the one provided shed light on what it meant.

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  56. 1. When looking into the song by Morissette, I found no real examples of irony, every situation just seemed to be ones of unfortunate accident or just plain bad luck. I remember reading in an article that in the early twentieth century, Australian sugar cane farmers near Queensland began to have a severe problem with an introduced species of cane beetle, which decimated their crops. In 1935, a solution was reached: introduce the cane toad, which is harmless to crops but preys on the cane beetle. The farmers' solution, however, not only failed to control their pest problem, it also resulted in the introduction of one of the most invasive and environmentally destructive species Australia had ever seen. Which was a way to show cosmic irony.

    2. The first video was an example of pastiche, as it was Tim Hawkins imitating well known music artists and the putting his own spin of kid songs to them, which doesn't quite make it a parody since he wasn't poking fun at the artists themselves but just fitting them to kid songs. As for the second video, it was an example of satire, because Tim was ridiculing the government, and pointing out all its flaws and drawing them out to be as bad as liars and thieves.

    3. Of the previous ones the only thing that confused me a bit was the difference between pastiche and parody, since they seem to be very similar, even with a fine line separating them.

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  57. 1.) In the Ironic music video, I didn't find any examples of actually irony, it was more just bad situations to be caught in. I had no idea that irony was this complex, so it's completely changing my perspective on what's actually irony.
    2.) The first video is an example of parody because it is taking popular songs and putting in new lyrics to fit the theme of the video. It's not necessarily mocking the songs, but it is putting a comedic twist to them. The second video is an example of satire and parody because it is attempting to embarrass the government into improving through a modified version of "The Candy Man". In this parody they are making fun of the government for being liars and thieves which is wear the satire comes from.
    3.) Situational irony really confused me to a degree and it still does somewhat. I guess it'll just take more time and repetition to get the full meaning!

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  58. 1. When looking into the song by Morissette, I found no real examples of irony, every situation just seemed to be ones of unfortunate accident or just plain bad luck. This could be ironic because of the way that the events seemed to occur in chronological order. There is lots of good examples of irony in many modern comedy bits such as Donald Glover or Bo Burnham. Irony is the basis of a lot of the world’s humor.

    2. The first video was an example of pastiche, as it was Tim Hawkins imitating well known music artists and the putting his own spin of kid songs to them, Tim was ridiculing the government.

    3. I wasn’t confused by much, except for the difference between a pastiche and a parody which can be easily determined once you know the fine details between the two.

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  59. 1. I could find any examples of true irony in the video. but there were some examples of verbal irony.

    2. The first video was an example of pastiche, because it was Tim Hawkins imitating music artists while still putting his own little twist in them. The second was an example of satire because Tim is humiliating the government by changing the song.

    3. I really wasn't confused that much except for the definition of Socratic irony.

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