Friday, September 5, 2014

AMERICAN LITERATURE:  Vintage or View Screen?  What's YOUR style?  What's the Future for Authors and Publishers?

I love technology.  But it also frustrates me.  I love that I can create things in color, with imagery, flashy transitions, and even film clips to use in my teaching.  I love that when I get a great idea for a chapter in my book, I can get it all down on paper just as fast as I can type (which is about 60 words per minute, thanks to typing class in high school) then go back later and delete, cut, paste, and move it around if necessary.  I love how with just my IPhone, I can connect with people all around the world in an instant, watch a video, change my facebook status, and text my family what to pick up from the grocery store so I can throw dinner together once I get home.  Technology is convenient, fast, and pretty amazing.

But I think it also costs.  Not just money (although as a Mac owner, I can attest there is quite a monetary cost involved) but also in personal connections.  Technology can rob us of eye contact with each other.  Instead of a phone call now, we are more likely to receive a text.  Instead of getting together with friends physically, many people stay home in their comfy pajamas and facebook each other.  Technology is even changing our language in frustrating ways, as I just exemplified using facebook as a verb, and also in "text talk," where the personal I is now i (hint:  my personal PET PEEVE!!!)  and beautiful words are reduced to two or three letter clusters.

Come to think of it, the personal I to i is a great way to symbolically represent what technology can do to us as individuals and our relationships if we let it dominate our lives.  It reduces them to the lower case.   One very specific area we are seeing this is in the realm of book publishing.  Now, instead of a physical book, many people are opting to download literature on a tablet, Nook or Kindle.  No more glossy, cover art work to dazzle the eyes; no more turning of crisp pages, touching the story as you read the words; no more smell of print.  It is a little heartbreaking to me,  although I must confess, I truly enjoyed my Kindle this summer.  Instead of packing six, thick, heavy books along on a trip, I had a thin, lightweight Kindle, giving me access to thousands of titles with wifi connection and a touch of a button.

We all know that technology has both enhanced and in some ways inhibited education and personal relationships, but what about the world of publishing?  What do Amazon and iBooks mean for the author, agent and publishing firm?  What about the bookseller?

This week, I have two videos for you to watch.  Please watch both and then tell me your thoughts on technology, literature, and how the two both help and hinder each other.   I will be patiently awaiting, in front of my screen, with my real, honest to goodness "vintage" book in hand...








68 comments:

  1. Now I must say I am totally not a person that can read a book on electronics. I have tried it before, but it literally frustrates me. Like you described earlier in your post the symptoms of reading a physical book, the smell of the print, the crisp pages, and ultimately the connection between the reader and the text; that is what I look forward to and can't substitute. However in the first video with the women and how her children's books were on an app now, I found that incredibly awesome! If I was a little kid I would definitely read the book on the app instead of the printed book. It is also a great tool to get young children interested in reading because of the animation; it keeps their attention very well. However for me that would not do... or maybe it would, I'm kind of a child at heart. Oh who am I kidding, I am under 18... I'm still a child. Anyway moving on, the second video I found interesting. I found it cool that websites are starting to sell both versions of books so that readers can choose which they prefer. I found it awesome that, that one young author would respond to each comment someone would post about her book... that's crazy, but I would love for an author to do that for me!! By the end of the video I got kind of irritated with Amazon. Now don't get me wrong, I love Amazon it has everything and for super cheap too, but they are kind of horrible people. For example because they want the books for cheaper they either delay shipping or they say those books are unavailable, like that is messed up! To conclude, If you people out there prefer the screen, go for it, but Im sticking to my Vintage pages!

    Oh another thought, people might also be going to apps and buying online books to save paper and the earth.... I guess I'm a planet killer. Oh well.

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    1. Ha! You are not a planet killer, don't worry. Paper Mills today are much more environmentally conscious; they plant to replace the trees they harvest for paper. Also, many printing presses use recycled paper for book now. So...go ahead and read vintage. ;)

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  2. I'm the kind of person that when I buy a book, I have to be able to smell that fresh book smell that they have. While reading I love highlighting important things referring to the book or even quotes that related to me or that I think are cute and inspiring that later on I might come back too and use it somewhere. Technology is changing rapidly and so are our life's with it. I have an eight year old sister and her childhood is very different than how mine was; I remember all I did as a child was go outside and play with my friends but she is the opposite. She just sits and watches youtube videos and plays on my parents phone all day until we tell her to stop. I'm bringing this up because the whole story telling book app is very relatable to us. My sister reads books like that all the time which I think it's really cute. It does not only read the book for her but it has a 3D effect to it which is awesome! Even I find myself reading the book apps with her. I think that was an amazing idea personally because kids nowadays are into technology more than ever.

    In the second video I liked how it mentioned that social media such as twitter helps spread the word about new books and how authors actually connect to their readers from it as well. For an example John Green actually connects and answers his readers questions by Tumblr, Twitter and YouTube. Amazon and ibooks are huge book sellers, every time I go to an airport mostly everyone who is reading a book is from their computers, phones, or kindles; and then there's me. That one percent who carries a highlighter and a book around most of the time. I also liked how the second video had a lot of facts, including when it pointed out that Amazon sells about 40% of the actual books other than books stores. That percentage is increasing every day; school's and student's are also a huge part of that percentage as well. This is very difficult for book sellers but the world of technology helps a lot because like mentioned before social media can spread the word for book selling.

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    1. This is a great analysis of the two excerpts. I like that you mentioned the outreach authors can make to their readers due to technology. This really supports the Reader's Response approach that so many elementary and middle school teachers take with literature. We are closer to the authors now because of it.

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  3. I absolutely hate reading books online. I refuse to buy a kindle or read from my MacBook air. Like you mentioned, I love the feel of having a book in my hands, being able to physically turn the pages and see the print. In the first video it talked about having children books come to life. I don’t really agree with it, but I do think it is an amazing idea. Kids now are all about electronics and when I was younger I didn’t have an iPhone or sat and watched TV all day. I see why turning a book into more a video game can be successful. Sometimes it can be so hard to keep a child’s attention and having a book they can interact with can be very beneficial to their learning. I just think it’s quite sad that the children of our generation will probably never hold a book or smell the “new book smell”. Also mentioned in the second video the narrator said “at your local book store. If you still have one.” This made me pretty sad, because bookstores are dying out because of the Internet and places like Amazon. The new generation will never know the great feeling of being able to go into a book store actually touch and look through the hundreds of book. Even though I love technology and all it has given us, I would still prefer a printed book to any book online.

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    2. I do prefer books in their original form. I think with my Kindle, it is the seduction of knowing in just one click, I can have a new book. ;) Of course, I would prefer spending a luxurious three hours in Barnes and Noble, with a cup of tea and bowl of soup in the cafe, but with the craziness of life, I am sad to say, that is a luxury I don't often get to enjoy anymore. For that, I am grateful for technology. But as a huge history buff and writer of historical fiction, I often am saddened by technology, too--the very technology I use to write these stories. Sometimes, I think maybe I was born in the wrong time; that writing with just pen and paper would have been just fine. So, yes, I understand what you are saying. It made me sad, too--the thought of no more bookstores, no matter how often I am able to visit them. They are important to our culture.

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  4. Okay, I'm going to be honest. I am guilty of having a Kindle and loving it. To me, it's more of an organization thing. You're able to keep as many books as you want on it, and you can get them all right when you want them. Of course, nothing can compare to having a book in your hand and hearing the sounds of the pages as you turn it. Also, the beautiful mess that is a book you've read over and over. Although, there are perks to using a Kindle. One being, some people get intimidated by looking at how big a book is. They see something like David Copperfield and will never pick it up. With Kindles, you can't see how big it is, so that scary factor is out of the equation. For me personally, I could go either way. Though as talked about in the first video, I think children need to have the books in apps. As I read in 'The Tipping Point', children respond well to bright colors and interaction, so an app is the perfect way to introduce them to reading.
    Amazon is a good example of people's preference. They give you the option of a book that you can hold and read, or the electronic version. They are also with 'Audible' which is a website where people can buy, download, and listen to their books. Personally, this would be my preference to school books I have to read that I don't really like. When it comes down to it, though, I have no preference. I find that they both allow you to get immersed in the story and have a great reading experience.

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  5. Great point about the fact that you cannot get intimidated by a Kindle. It's always thin, no matter how long the story. I became addicted to my Kindle this summer for that reason. :)

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  6. Technology always seems to be adapting in some shape or form. Now that iBooks and Amazon, and Kindles have been making an impact on society, it is easy to see how fast our lives change depending on what we use, and think is popular. While it is convenient to just slip your Kindle into your bag and bring it along into the outside, the only problem I have with that is who is taking the electronic device to read. If you take a young children that has been reading out of a book with actual pages that you can turn, and a child that has been around technology and tablets, and leaning how to swipe a tablet to read, then the child with a tablet will have less of an attention span.
    There was a test performed with children to see how their attention will stay focused while given a strange new toy. The children were given a Jack-In-The-Box and were not told how to work it, the kids only knew that this was their new toy. Instead of asking questions, the children’s curiosity took over, and they began to figure out how to work the Jack-In-The-Box because that is how the human brain works. It wants to interact and learn for themselves to have the satisfaction that it fixed something.
    Digital media can help in many ways, however, it should not be used as a distraction. We should be able to find new ways to entertain ourselves. For me personally, I would much rather call a person to see how they’re doing. And yes, I did just get an iPhone for my 17th birthday, and texting I will admit, is a lot faster than having to leave a message on the phone, but if someone has the time to talk, I would want to hear my friend’s voice so we can hear each other’s tone. That, I feel is an effective way to communicate. If you put communication aside, let’s go back to the iBook crisis as I’d like to call it.
    While it is portable for anyone that has to travel and doesn’t feel like having a novel in their possession, can we take a second to think about who we are giving access to iBooks. I don’t think a child would mind having a hardcover Dr. Seuss if they didn’t know you could access it on their parent’s tablet or phone. Do we have to keep entertaining children just to get them to learn? Or is it a matter of the teaching style? If more teachers could just sit down for a few minutes longer with the child and work out what it is they need help with, then more children would have a better time learning from their actual mistake.
    If we take this controversy on an economical level I would say it’s not very smart to just get rid of actual books completely. That is literally thousands of jobs being put away. The authors…well, I don’t think it would effect them too much. If everyone is purchasing electronically, then nothing is stopping them from writing their net hit, but as for publishers and bookstores, and libraries, they will be losing money if people are not going to them for books. So far, over a dozen of Barnes and Nobles have gone out of business, one of the main reasons that people aren’t really going in for books, they would probably buy the Nook from there and never return because they’re off downloading books somewhere.

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    1. Yes, you are right. Kids today do have shorter attention spans, and many researchers are saying it is because of the instantaneous world we live in--and their overuse of technology. I think technology is a good thing, but I think that it is our over-dependence and addiction to it that turns it into a not so good thing. I am going to go to the IB profile attribute of balance here--I think it is the rarest trait to find these days, and it is what we so desperately need. Go ahead and play a video game or two with your friend, but then, turn it off, get out on that bike, and ride to the lake, take a swim in the pool, play a board game or some cards. Get out into the world and experience it, taste it, touch it for real instead of relying too much on the fast paced virtual version. :)

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  7. My thoughts on ebooks are good and bad. They are good because it allows the reader to sample books for free and if the reader enjoys it, they buy the book. I think that's beneficial to a lot of people because who would want to buy a book at the store and then end up not liking it because you didn't really get a sample of it? I know I wouldn't want to own any books I didn't enjoy. It's a waste of space in my library. However, ebooks are bad because they are very easy to come by. That's not a bad thing for the readers, because it would be free, but that's very bad for the author. They are not getting the credit and money they deserve for their work.

    To clarify my thoughts, ebooks aren't bad for teenagers and adults, but I think they are harmful to children. Now, I know the readers can actually interact with the book, and that's great. But I feel like they're learning that reading is all about fun and games. Creating the actions for the kids isn't allowing the kids to access their imagination. Reading involves imagining what is going on. That's the best part about reading, in my opinion. How can the next generation imagine what's going on if they're used to being shown what's going on? I feel as if the kids aren't learning to express themselves through books and might hate reading when they're older because they didn't have the opportunity to make something happen in their head. I know that there are pictures in children's books, and I guess someone would say that's not accessing their imagination either, but it's different. It's different in a sense that kids are seeing the images but are imagining the characters moving and talking. They can't do that on ebooks.

    Real books both have their share of bad and good qualities too. Real books are good because they're good for your eyes(not staring at a screen for hours). They are also good because you retain information better. For me, I retain information either way, it's not really different for me. Real books could be a bad thing because, like you said, they are heavier. They are also costly and could be damaged easily. Personally, I love real books. I love ebooks too, but owning an ebook isn't owning the actual thing to me. I need to buy the physical copy of a book. Otherwise, I feel like I haven't actually read it. Right now, I have to buy about fifteen books I've already read because they were ebooks. I love the feeling of knowing I have the physical copy of a book.

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    1. I love your post here, Madisyn--especially your commentary on the active e books for kids. I think as a society, we are teaching our young ones that they need to depend on outside sources for entertainment. The book is now doing all the work rather than the imagination of the readers. In a way, it makes me feel sorry for kids growing up with all this amazing technology and not knowing any different. We live in a society of instant gratification. There is no leisurely "walk" through a story, getting lost in thought as you read a story--creating the "look" of the creators in your mind and playing a movie in your head of the story. I know what you mean about not really FEELING like you have read a book unless you own it. I actually ended up buying a book I originally had on my kindle just because I wanted to hold it. :)

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  9. My personal taste is to read book while they are physically sitting in my hands. For whatever reason, the ebook has never been quite as enticing as intended. It really takes me out of the whole essence that is reading a book. Turning pages, dog earring your favorite moments and that first time you break the bind on a book are a few of the many reasons that physical books are so enticing. However, I will admit to using my nook for a few of my monthly comic subscriptions. I find that the nook is much easier to read off of in that regard as I would much prefer to take lightweight digital device then a handful of flimsy and delicate comics. That being said, the nook is only used by my parents who simply adore reading their novels off of the thin, little device. Ironic isn't it? I am the teenager, and yet it's my parents who are completely sucked into the idea of reading a book off a device. They offer to have me read their novels but I often refuse. I wouldn't be able to retain the information given if i didn't hold the physical book in my own two hands. I have a strange feeling that there is a sort of understanding that goes into holding a book, call it a connection if you must… Informations gets through to me a lot stronger if I may grasp a tangible document.

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    1. I agree. There is something to that whole "learning through osmosis" thing. Touching a work by a favorite author helps me connect to that author. It almost makes the story part of you.
      What you observed with your parents loving the Nook and your preferring a book is something I have heard before. I think maybe it may be the novelty of the "new" technology that is exciting to our generation, while the younger generation has so much technology, a book is a cool "relief" from all the fast-paced stimulation, perhaps. :)

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  10. I love having new books, I will probably go broke because of them too! But sometimes it's okay to just buy the e-book version, it is much cheaper, but for those who are vintage, you lose the ability to hear the new spine crack a little, or smell the freshly printed ink, or even touch the beautiful shiny cover, and flip the crisp pages. So there are pro's and con's to the everyday reader's dilemma, I am a vintage reader 98% of the time. 2% of the time I'm all for the technology because Amazon is super cheap and I have to give in! In the video with the children and their apps, I have to say, it's not that abnormal to see that in our world today. It's a little sad to me because as a child I would go ecstatic for a real book, and now that a lot of kids seem to hate them, and the apps are just getting better and more colorful for them, they don't want to pick up a book that has the same content as the e-book version of it. I agree with Megan, it might have to do with the fact that kids are intimated by a big fat book rather than a thin kindle, but I feel like that is still no excuse to not read a real book. Everyone is capable of reading a real touchable book, it's really not that big of a difference content wise, but sometimes it just depends on the preferences of the reader and if he/she likes technology a lot and can get the hang of it better than others, or if he/she is more on the vintage side.

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    1. I agree 100%. I am also saddened by the seductive power of the app over the book. I used to LOVE going to the library with my library card, picking my books to read for the week, and rushing home to read them and smell the pages. :) It was magical. Plus, it was something fun I got to do with my mom--we'd get out of the house, make a special trip, look and share a story, and maybe stop for an ice-cream cone or Italian soda at this place by the beach on the way home. THAT beats an app any day. :)

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  11. Technology and literature both help and hinder each other in different ways. My preference is to read a hardcover book and being able to physically turn the pages, while others may prefer a swipe of a screen. Technology may help literature because it gets the word out about a new book or article much faster, and, as you had said, is much easier to carry around a lightweight kindle than 6 large books. It hinders literature though, because people are beginning to become accustomed to web articles and everything getting straight to the point. I think we are losing sight of what is true, beautiful literature, and getting it confused with the articles that we see today. Because of technology and being able to buy books online, it's extremely hard for me to find a good bookstore! Then again, it all depends on your reader. In the second video the woman had said that people are beginning to realize that this isn't an "or" discussion, it's an "and" discussion. This meaning that people, such as you, aren't only reading books physically or online, you're doing both. In saying that, I conclude that we should learn to accept the new technological literature, yet we should keep pushing towards physical literature.

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    1. I am so glad you mentioned that "or" vs. "and" discussion from the video. That does give us hope, doesn't it? The invention of one form of literature doesn't necessarily negate the need for the other. An excellent point.

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  12. I think that technology has actually revolutionized how read and how we understand what we are reading. I can't read online, however for someone who can't afford held copies of a book they can go online and read it with ebooks. No they aren't having the connection between turning the pages, but at least those people can have a chance at reading the book. Then sites like amazon have revolutionized how we can get our hands on books and they are a lot cheaper as well. You could buy a book from amazon and get it sent to you which is a major help for people who can't get to a library or can't read online.

    With that marketing books, as stated in the second video, is very important and technology helps tremendously with that. Twitter helps spread the word about books and literature, social media in general makes different things with literature known. You could easily go on different websites and share your experience with a book with someone else across the world by chatting. No it is not a face to face talk about the book, but the fact that you can go online and talk to someone with a completely different social norm, and different culture it makes a huge impact on how you may see things.

    I see the light in technology and literature, and i think that without it books, and our language and literature wouldn't be as strong.

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    1. I love that you talked about accessibility. You are right--electronic literature sources have made getting books both less expensive and easier for people who may not otherwise have that access. Not to mention, you don't have the issues of them running out and having to wait for a book to be returned (library) or be ordered. I think I agree with the lady in the video: it is more of an "and" discussion than an "or," which is a good thing. :)

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  13. I have been a huge reader ever since I learned to read when I was six. I had always loved physical books and loved to fill our giant bookcase with dozens of books. Lately though, I've been reading more on electronics. It has an appeal that I hadn't noticed until lately. I like how accessible hundreds of different books are and I don't have to check it out at the library and carry it home or take the time to search through shelves and shelves of books to pick and choose which ones I get to take with me. But nonetheless I adore reading from a physical copy. I love having the weight in my hands and turning pages, seeing how far I am from the end and sometimes just stroking the cover when I get overemotional. I think it's great that electronic reading is encouraging people to read more, because it's more accessible and easier to carry around. But I also think that people shouldn't just read on electronics, but also visit local libraries and bookstores. There's a certain kind of satisfaction that comes from browsing through the shelves when you have the time to take as long as you want. It's also really cool to be around other people who are there for the same reasons as you are and like reading physical books just like you. While technology has helped better connect people to books, I think that they should sometimes go back to the physical copy.

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    1. I totally agree. I think reading from both sources is beneficial, as they both have their unique advantages. :)

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  14. I think e-books are a positive thing mostly. E-books make it easier to get a book, so you don’t have to run out to a bookstore or a library every time you want to read a new book. With e-books you can just go on your phone, tablet, or computer, search for the book you want, and purchase it. This is a lot quicker than running out to get a book and you can start reading faster. This also makes it easier to produce because a ton of copies don’t need to be printed out and they can instead be uploaded and the just downloaded by whoever wants to read them. This also makes the books cheaper for the user. Bookstores may also still have the possibility of staying open because there will always be the readers who still want a printed out book and want to sit down in bookstores and read. This way if you just want to quickly download a book then you can or if you want the experience you get from a printed out book then you can have that too.

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    1. I am glad to see a post that offers the many advantages of reading technology, too!

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  15. Obviously, technology is always going to progress and there will always be those people who oppose these ideas that go beyond their traditional form of doing something. But is greater opposition always a bad thing? Hundreds of years ago people had to wait to receive messages by foot until they found out that they could use birds to send these messages in faster more productive ways. There is always going to be some form of progression for isn't this apart of human nature? On the contrast there are always going to be people who cling to their traditions because that is either all they know and are comfortable with or they are too suborn to admit that positive things can come from change. Now of days we have come to a point in time where we don't always have to be on one side of the fence or the other. Especially in America where we have access to so many different recourses even if you fall within the lower economic class you have a chance to be apart of the new changes. If you want to read a book online you could save money for a device that allows you to do so and go to a local area of business to access the internet. If you would rather hold a whole book in your hand and be able to physically interact with a piece in some way you can do so through establishments such as libraries. My preferred style of reading is always going to be a book because I love the smell, the feeling of turning a page and the fulfillment of finally attaining knowledge when I close the cover after finishing a book. However, what works for one individually does not always work for the next and I believe authors recognize this. Authors have seen that small children respond to interactive bright screens and have then adjusted their products accordingly. Other authors and publishers have also seen that some cling to the old ways and have again adjusted their products. I don't necessarily think that physical books will disappear completely because as seen in the second video even more people have recognized this change in reading styles and have joined specific groups in order to preserve what they feel is a fleeting tradition. I do feel that other companies such as amazon are not being fair to the authors and readers who prefer certain styles of reading by of literature by taking away options which may affect certain peoples reading habits long-term. The future for authors and publishers is undetermined for many factors come in to play but I believe that whatever happens the authors and publishes will find a way to accommodate the majority. I believe that the underlying issue to this is that people now a days are just not reading as much as they used to. We have so many other forms of entertainment where the information can simply be fed to us and we don't have to use the brain power that it might take to fully enjoy a book or work of literature. Its sad but as the world (especially America) progresses we don't always want to put in that effort. I believe that this is the main reason for literature to go in one way or another and that perhaps authors have seen this and have used technology to introduce literature to people in a more familiar format.

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    1. WOW! There is a lot of great thought and contemplation here, and you have made several very valid points. I love how you discussed progression in communication technology in general, and that while the "techno reading" may be new, change is not. I agree with you that we will learn to "co-exist" as vintage and video readers. There is definitely a place for both. I also sadly agree that people are not reading as much anymore. Maybe that is the REAL problem. Maybe offering reading in "cool" technology will ultimately encourage it again. I feel that the video game revolution is a big culprit in reducing reading. I am not against video games, but I am FOR the balance. :)

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  16. I personally have very mixed feelings over this subject. When I was younger, I was a very avid reader, and owned both physical and early e-books. E-books were a new thing, an exciting way to hold hundreds of books in your palm. While I loved the convenience of the e-books, there was something unique, and nearly spiritual, about a paper book. Carrying around a physical book gave me a sense of connection with the text. I could flip through the entire story with my thumb, page by page. When the story excited me, I would turn the pages rapidly, and hear the delicate slicing of pages gliding past each other. There was something comforting about being able to hold the concrete story in your hands. Now with an e-book, the best offered was the swipe of a finger across glass. Also,with those early e-books, screen glare was an issue, an issue which often distracted from the story itself. And then there was my favorite part of paper books; the times when a book became so re-read that it started to fall apart. A well-loved book is certainly a heart-warming sight. With an e-book, all I get is a low battery warning. All nostalgic rambling aside, what I'm trying to get at is that physical books have a certain air about them that cannot be reproduced digitally. Now, for some people, convenience is a must, as they cannot lug around a dozen books at a time. And that is fine. Whether e-books or physical books are your preference is a personal thing. There is no right or wrong side in the e-book argument, only opinion. For now, there is no way to know which will be the eventual winner, so for now all we can do is pick a side and enjoy it how we please.

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    1. I love how you talked about reading a physical book as a spiritual thing. It truly is. I still will say it can be connecting with another "soul" (the author) who may very well be long gone, yet their heart on paper is sliding through my fingers and reaching out to manipulate my emotions. It is a pretty miraculous thing. While one can argue that the connection is being made through words on a screen, it doesn't feel the same.

      As long as people keep reading, I guess I am grateful. :)

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  17. I'm a vintage reader. I love to sit on the couch with a blanket and a book. Something about turning the pages and being able to flip back and forth to different parts. Its more annoying to do that on a kindle or ipad. I also think I prefer actual books over digital for concentration reasons. Ipads and kindles have the internet and notifications popping up every two seconds so it is really easy to divert away from the reading to something else. I have also found that it is harder to see on a screen than on real paper.
    I'm kind of glad I grew up with real books instead of digital ones. I can remember certain books from my childhood that I still own and when I look at them, they bring back great memories. Ipads and kindles are both easier to carry around and takes up less space but they are always upgrading to new ones or even breaking. It is easier to lose those books into space then paper one and digital doesn't have the same emotional impact that the real books hold between their pages.
    For authors, I think technology may really help spread reading to new generations. I have found that the love of reading is being lost over time so by using resources, such as the ipad, the younger generations can be brought back to the love of reading. The author in the first video is smart by publishing her books through an app. A close family friend has a 18 month baby and she already can navigate on an IPhone. The childrens book app and similar things are great to have for children the see and interact with. Directing their attention to the cool book that has dancing pigs rather than YouTube or a silly game that won't teach them anything.
    Amazon is one of those resource that I personally love. It is so much cheaper to buy books on amazon than at the book store. $18.99 or $8.99? I'm going to go with $8.99. Then I could have two books! Now I mentioned, I love real books so I love book stores. And if prices were more reasonable I would sure go there more often.

    It is all a matter of preference. I welcome technology... as long as it doesn't eliminate real books. (:

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    1. Yes! Your last statement really resonates with me. And I enjoyed your point about how the apps for reading are more positive than kids sitting in front of a computer screen shuffling through Youtube videos.

      I love Amazon, too. I don't like what they did to the smaller book sellers, but I have to look for more reasonable deals, and Amazon gives those for sure, and they make Christmas shopping easier, too!

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  18. I'm a little inexperienced on the topic since I don't have a lot of background knowledge on using a kindle or an e-book for reading. I have yet to make the transition but I also am not naive enough to believe that the world is moving a little faster than I can keep up. I'm willing to give with a lot of things when it comes to technology. Less handwritten letters and more text messages, but when it comes to books for pleasure I'm a little on the fence.
    It's amazing how some of the children's books are so interactive now adays making our youth more alert and comprehensive back when I was growing up. I think for education purposes online books and text are so useful. It's easy to get, pick up and read. Even text books have been slowly transitioning to online and it's easier to carry a mac book compared to four text books.
    As for personal pleasure, it will be hard for me to get out of my rut of going to a book store, looking at all the covers (Yes, that's wrong- but they're so pretty!) and picking out a book for me to read. I like book stores and the atmosphere of libraries, it's almost frightening for me to think that in fifty years from now the concept of a library is a "Back when I was your age..." tale.
    I'm willing and ready to embrace technology and all it can do to further our knowledge as individuals, but do we have to do it all at once?

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    1. First of all, it is NEVER wrong to love looking at pretty book covers. The artists also work hard and deserve our attention, right? ;) I agree that embracing technology is more of a slow process that involves some switching of partners (from techno books back to paper). Heck, I even will need to pull out my good old notebook to write in sometimes because I just cannot make the necessary thought connections at warp speed on my computer sometimes. I think it is good to take hands with technology, but, hey....we have two hands, right? I am keeping one hand on my paperbacks, too!

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  19. I prefer reading a hard copy of a book. I've attempted several times to read books on a screen and it really doesn't work for me. I personally feel as though I can't get the full effect of the text. I don't know what it is about a screen but my mind wanders so much when I try to read on a screen and I can never truly focus or get anything out of the text that way. I found both videos to be quite interesting. I like the idea that the first video on the children's book presented. I feel as though that would keep children more engaged in the reading and we want them to be because it's important that children know how to read. I also agree with points made in the second video. I agree with James Patterson's feelings on Amazon. I understand that e-books may be easier for people to read, however I don't feel as though that gives a company the right to try and gain a monopoly on an industry. I thoroughly enjoy going to Barnes & Nobles and searching for a book. I feel as though the whole atmosphere of the bookstore gives reading so much more appeal and it also makes me more excited to read a book. Overall, I feel that e-books should be made available to those that prefer them, but I would hate for them to take over the whole book market. That feeling of opening a new book and smelling that new book smell is what gives reading its whole appeal to me and I would hate to see that disappear. Both physical copies and e-books have their place in this world and neither one should take over the book market.

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    1. Totally agree with you on reading on a screen! My mind wanders, too--I have the hardest time editing on a screen when I am working, too. I am glad to hear it is not just me being "old school." ;)

      I agree with regards to book stores. I am okay with the Kindle revolution, but I would really hate to see book stores die out. Libraries are already nearly extinct, so it seems.

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  20. I use to hate reading books, both E-books and regular books. I hated to read. Until I was told that if I didn't read The Hunger Games my life was going to end. So I went to Barnes & Noble and reluctantly picked it up and gave it a go. Because I didn't intend on finishing it the day after I got it, it never occurred to me to buy the second and third book while I was there. So I got on to my iPad and bought the E-books, I hated it. I couldn't focus on the screen because after starring at it for a long time the light annoyed my eyes. Not to mention I would get side tracked with all of my other apps. I didn’t make that magical physical connection with those two books like I did with the first. I couldn’t highlight and mark my favorite pages, or doodle in the margins what I pictured a scene looking like. You couldn’t bend it in half or put your cute bookmark in it. The ebook just wasn’t and still isn’t my thing. And if I was an author I would personally not allow my books to be sold as E-books or on Amazon. Now I know they are both great ways to share your books and gain readers, but I would rather my readers to still take part in the experience of going to the store and searching for my book and the satisfaction you get once it’s in your hands and that unique smell books have that is so pleasing. In the second video Dominique Raccah said “E-books are bringing in more readers because keep people can sample more” and I found this a bit funny. My opinion is wouldn’t going to the bookstore and being able to read any book in there for about 10 minutes to figure out if you like it a lot easier than buying a book on the E-books and never read it? Oh of course I don’t know how the whole sampling process works with e-books which is what I’m asking you.

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    1. First of all, I must say I am THRILLED to hear you are unabashed about writing in and marking your books. :) That is great news. To answer your question, sampling on kindles is pretty cool. I did that a LOT this summer. They basically send you a full chapter or two, and you read and decide if you want it. If not, no money lost. They also have a "one book a month" borrowing program. You can borrow a book for a month, totally free, read it, and then the next month, if you want to borrow another, you just agree to give the one you have back, and you can check out another one. Reading on a screen was super hard for me until I purchased the Kindle white. That seemed better. Still, there is nothing like writing in and dog-earing a book!

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  21. When I think of books, I think of the 600 page monsters you can find in Barnes and Nobel and a lot of other bookstores. I own a Kindle Fire, but I don't ever use it, because one: its not really working correctly, and two: I like using physical books. It amuses me to turn the pages and read on. I also enjoy being able to see how much more I have of the book left in thickness as well. I am unabke to look at numbers and really tell how much I have left and sometimes it seems so much longer then it really is.
    When I was watching the videos, I noticed that people enjoyed the animated pictures from e books, or that's what I took from the first video from FOX News. It is understandable that kids would enjoy the moving pictures on the digital version more then the still pictures within the paper copy. Most kids are enthusiastic about story time, just think about how psyched they would be about their story moving and coming to life.
    I personally think that having digital copies of a book defeats the purpose of reading a book. I mean, you usually go and read a book by going to a library or to a bookstore. As digital text gets more and more popular, the need for paper copies will diminish and it'll be a lost market. The second video had a few people talking about how they get their books a bit more well know by talking to people about it and going to conventions and talking about their books. But what if fewer and fewer people go to those conventions? The one problem I have with digital books is that i feel like it takes away from the pride of having a wall of books. What's really more impressive: a small electronic device with a few hundred books on it or have all the original books on your very wall staring back at you wanting to be read?
    However electronics can make things a lot more efficient for us humans, especially since we all get lazier and lazier each generation. As you stated, you don't have to carry 15 thousand heavy books wherever you go if you have your nook or kindle. Also you can type up your stuff too without a care in the world and a worry about losing it (unless your computer hits the trash...). The way technology keeps advancing, it makes it seem that its so much easier to do things now a days. We can have full on conversations with our friends and family by just sending a text. You can also use little pictures and smileys to show some kind of stiff emotion, which doesn't always come out clear. But there's a negative to it too, it effects our grammar and how we speak as well.
    Also about the point of technology effecting how we talk and such, I have felt the affects of it, sadly. I have a very hard time with grammar and also spelling mainly because of texting through out my teen years. It has become a growing problem as well in my opinion because now that we have auto correct and all that jazz, there isn't a need to learn how to spell. All you have to do is get the jist of the word and your electronic device will fix it for you. I only learned a year ago the difference between your and you're, and how to use them properly. This saddens me a bit because you can kind of see how the next generation is going to be so much worse then we are now since as children, they are allowed to sit on the TV or the playstation or the phone and stare at them all day without a care in the world. I wish there was some way that we could have all the easiness from electronics but still be able to preserve the good nature of writing and books.

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    1. I think it shows a lot of self-actualization that you can recognize that technology has affected you in terms of grammar and spelling, so kudos to you for that. I think I would have LOVED having a computer as a teen, but in a way, I am really grateful that I didn't grow up in technology like we have today. For one, I have handwriting I am very proud of (we were graded on it in school) and two, I can spell very well, and had grammar pounded into me by my red-pen wielding English teachers. ;) I do SO agree with your comment on collections of books--they absolutely class up a home and a wall. I cannot imagine my home without lots and lots of beautiful books. :)

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  22. Personally I don't really care if I read a hard copy of a book or a digital copy there are positive and negative things with them both. I guess it kind of depends on the situation. If you're reading a book with a billion pages and its thick I think its better to have a digital copy. Its easier that way, you don't have to carry a huge book around and I don't know about you but if I hold a thick book for a while my hands start to get tired and hurt but thats probably just because i'm lazy. When you're reading on a kindle its super thin and you can just simply scroll through the pages. On the other hand if you're reading a book thats not too thick its easy to carry around and who doesn't love the smell of a new book. I think I get the same affect whether reading on a kindle or a hard copy. I don't really have one I prefer over the other.

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    1. I think your opinion is truly the popular one, which is great news, because it means that we can have both. Who says we cannot have our cake and eat it too, right? (That's a silly idiom, anyway!)

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  23. Recently I have taking more of a liking to reading. I use to be the one who hated to read and dreaded the homework where I had to read. I find it ironic it when E-books and kindles are at my fingertips, I become a vintage reader. An E-book might be able to provide me with a sample of a book with the press of a button but it wont give me the satisfaction of going to the book store and and spending hours sitting in the sci-fy or romance section debating which book I want the most. Yes, reading hard cover or soft cover books cost more then an e-book would but there are some advantages when owning the E-book along with the hard copy. With the hard copy of the book annotating is much easy to draw lines, highlight and make connections. Personally, the E-book would come in handy while writing an easy because with today's technology trying to find a quote will be easier then going through the book looking at the other quotes you have highlighted. I am very undecided towards liking E-books or hard copy, the e-book offers so much but it does not offer the qualities the hard copy has; for example I absolutely love the smell of the book pages. That's one small detail the E-book can not offer. For the people who are able to sit and read off their computer screen I envy them because reading off a screen just distracts me, to much going on while I am trying to read, therefore I am more of a vintage reader but I do welcome technology and use it when in desperately need it.

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    2. You know, it just struck me as I was reading your passage, many of the comments discuss the smell of the pages--I SO agree! But it also made me think of Christmas trees. Used to be that EVERYONE had a real tree, and hardly anyone had fake because: A. The fake ones looked SUPER tacky and fake and B. No smell of pine. Even though now there are more fake trees out there--and they look AMAZING--there are still live tree lots everywhere because some people will always love picking out the tree, and enjoying the smell of pine (except me, because I lost that vote in my home. Boo Hoo!). I like how you worded your last statement: you prefer vintage but "welcome technology." I think that is a very healthy way to embrace the future. :)

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  24. I am really torn when it comes to the topic of real books versus ebooks. The feeling of holding a hard copy is beyond expressing in words. I enjoy turning my own pages, leaving bookmarks, and annotating. I am personally a fan of holding a real book in my hand and eventually putting it on a bookshelf. There is only one exception when I will read an ebook instead of a hard copy, and that is when I am on vacation. I take my Nook/Kindle on vacation because ebooks are portable. I can carry a whole library with hundreds of books on one little device. It is also very simple and easy to purchase and download ebooks through the Internet because they are delivered almost instantaneously. In relation to the videos, I think creating apps for children that show literature with imagery is a great idea. These apps will help children pick up language at a faster rate because they are hearing words/phrases over and over again. I believe that technology/literature is going to change over time, and that authors and publishers are going to have to adapt to the new technology being produced. In 10-20 years I know for a fact that there's going to be a new way of interpreting/producing literature because the world is evolving every second, minute, hour of everyday. There is no denying it...

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    1. Good point--who knows what will happen beyond Kindles, right? :)

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  25. I love real books! im sorry I had to say it. Even though I love real books, ebooks do have its advantages. for example I often read new books online and then buy the real book, so I dont spend money on books I dont like. Yay for the Author, I bought two copies. unfortunatlry with ebooks came illegal ones you can get for free. Now the author isn't selling books and receiving money.
    I use amazon all the time. As do a lot of people. Books are cheaper on amazon. Amazon controls a lot of book sells and publishing and not all for the best. Are people going to stop using amazon, probably not.
    Whats to be done? Book stores are rare anymore so what else is there to do but by books off line or buy ebooks?

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    1. I love Amazon too, but I certainly hope I don't live to see the death of book stores. I LOVE them!

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  26. Technology and Literature have a very special relationship: they work for and against each other constantly.

    Literature is an area that is grounded in the past. Written works will attempt, whether set in the past, present, or future, and whether they are fictional or nonfictional, to teach a particular lesson learned from human experiences in the past. Time moves onward without stopping to make sure that we are keeping up, and writers want to stop us, and drag us back to a point, saying to us: Before you go on, take note of these lessons, which are set for you in this writing. Do not let them slip away, lest you walk blindly in the unlit corridors of the future!

    Technology aims to enhance the passing of time, with inventions making each moment worth much more. From inventions that are now very old to us, such as the Cotton Gin (making the amount of cotton that could be harvested in each moment much greater) to the more recent creations such as the online social networks, making the time it takes to write a message serve to reach hundreds of people instead of a few.

    As far as individuals are concerned, technology can hinder literature by offering innumerable distractions that could not have existed before. A potential reader or writer could easily go make a random Facebook post, or play a free online game instead of pursuing a topic of reading or writing that they might have otherwise done. Technology also makes literature more accessible at the same time, and so it works in part for literature.

    Literature can hinder technology by encouraging feelings against certain technological developments, or more potently, by causing us to stick to certain familiar and old values, and causing many of us to be resistant to any technology that would remove some of these things from us. For example: we may become very attached to the light brushing sound as we turn pages in a book, or the feel of the book's cover in our hands, or even the smell of the paper as we hold a book close to our eyes, and immerse ourselves in its contents. Literature inspires technology, and develops our imaginations, exercising them rigorously, and by this we can come to new and exciting possibilities, thus working in part for technology.

    For the bookseller, and the publisher, the growing popularity of such things as iBooks and Amazon's book business mean that your business is going to dwindle in a significant manner. The big companies have the means and the money now to reach customers more efficiently than you can hope to.

    For the writer, the vast numbers of other writers out there that are able to reach huge audiences means that your chances of getting noticed among the crowd are very small. On the positive side of things, if you do get noticed, you have the potential to become very, very popular in a short period of time.

    For the reader, things are more convenient than ever. One doesn't even have to travel to a library and check out books. You can log onto a device and have thousands of books at your disposal in seconds.

    Taking everything all together, I find myself coming back to a familiar concept which I have written, thought, and spoke of on several occasions. This concept is that we are faced with the opposing values of Quality and Quantity (the second word falls somewhere between quantity and accessibility), and that to gain more of one, we must sacrifice something of the other. As technology develops, the opportunities we have to read are dramatically increased, but we lose something special, something critical and in the essence of reading itself. What is it exactly? Perhaps some deeper connection and understanding with a text? I do not know exactly what, but I can feel its growing absence, and it creates a mournful feeling in me. Part of the spirit of literature is dying, it is happening right now, even as you read these words, and accelerating until it becomes nigh unstoppable. Who will save it if not us? Our descendants? They may never know what it was.

    -Duncan Robinson

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    1. I think your point about quality vs. quantity is spot on. I think this is true with so many things. If you look at construction and architecture in the past: buildings, furniture and toys used to be built by artisans, and they were built to stand the test of time. Now? Most toys are plastic, break by year two, furniture is built to be replaced every few years, and homes are ....well, they are not built with the notion of "historic landmark" in mind. Why should we expect anything to be different with our literature? (Well, I expect more, of course, and so do we who love great literature).

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  27. I really don't care whether it's in a kindle or hardcover/paperback book because I can honestly admit that I despise reading with a passion. I just absolutely can NOT just sit there and read something that bores the living crap out of me, unless I have to do it. There are Pros and Cons about the way people choose to read. Now that I'm back at Odyssey I realize how much reading we do whether it's Mrs.Hurley's class reading from a text book, or Mrs.Caraway's class reading articles and her blog online. The online books can instantly provide me with millions and millions of books at my fingertips, not knowing which one to choose you can just read the sample and determine it from there, and if you don't like it then you move on to the next one, until you find the one book that interest you. As for your tree killing, ugly smelling, paper book you can read the first couple of pages, decide whether you want it, or not, and then go ahead and buy it. If you don't end up liking it, well too bad because there ain't no return for this baby! Yeah, the prices of electronics is already going up due to how many people are switching, but at the same time book prices might go up as well dude to not so many sales of paper back books and as well as the online books due to high demand of Nooks or Kindles. In this generation people are becoming zombies cuz their eyes are out of saliva, from staring at a screen too long In regards to all of this...I just don't like it regardless, and it does not catch my attention

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  28. (Prepare for longness, I even had to break it up, because it wouldn't let me post altogether my page of writing. I'm so sorry, I get carried away) First off, the first video? Very cool. I like that they have more interactive books for younger readers, to hopefully get them into reading. BUT OH MY GOSH, for the life of me, I will not read another e-book unless its the best book int eh world, and its only available on an e-reader. I do not like kindles. I do not like nooks. I do not like reading books on the computer. "I would not, could not, read an e-book. Not on a plane, not in a box, please digital age, let me be!" I'll leave the rhyming to Dr.Seuss, because wow, that was bad. But getting back to the point, I have to go vintage. I would probably die, metaphorically and literally, if I couldn't turn my own pages, smell my books, trace my fingers along the paper as I see the words that hold the most meaning to me. I really can not do it at all. And I am quite happy with that. This is going to sound weird, and wrong, but I'm glad that I have a closed mind at times. I am very, very, close minded about books. I have specific genres that I read. I cannot read any other books, until I am finished with a select few I have arranged in my head, I have to like the cover to read a book, I must be able to find myself identifying with the book just after reading the summary, and I have to search around Barnes and Noble, (or other book stores) to find books. Meaning, I cant just look up books online, or have someone recommend a book to me, unless I've seen it before that. This all sounds really weird, and particular. But I have my rituals. And I love them.

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    1. (CONTINUED)
      I just do not feel like I am a reader, unless I am holding it in my hand, and have stacks upon stacks on my nightstand, vanity, under the bed, in the closet, in drawers, and under clothes. Along with that, I do not feel (this next word would totally be bolded if I could do that, while commenting) connected, without a true reader and book experience, or what I consider one. Let me give you an example. The summer before I started at OI, I had gone to Barnes and Noble, everyday for almost 2 weeks. I would spend, at least 3 hours there before leaving. I would sit in the bug comfy chairs, and I would see all kinds of people, and sometimes theyd talk to me, and other times they wouldn't. I didnt mind either, I, in fact, loved, and still love, both. But one day, I walk over and sit down. There was already 2 other woman sitting on the 2 other chairs. One was a 20 year old Hispanic girl, and the other was a 63 year old African American woman. I quietly sat down, slipped an ear bud in, and half listened to music, and half listened to their conversation. It was about politics. I enjoyed that so I continued listening. Soon I interjected, and before I knew it we were all talking about everything. The older lady was named Barbette. She was a social worker for most of her life, and an avid reader. The only girl, whose name I cant recall, was an engaged girl who dropped out of High School, and was about to get her GED. She was from California. And not the good parts. We talked for 2 hours before the young girl had to leave. But Barbette and I didn't stop talking. She told me stories about social working, and I told her about my family. We talked about books, and history, and politics, and it was fantastic. I hadn't even touched my phone since Id sat down. Then my sister showed up, and informed me it was already past 6, and I had been there since 12. Me and this lady who was so much older than me, had talked for 6 hours! It was crazy. I had to leave at that point, and I told Barbette I hoped I would see her again sometime. Sure enough, a few days later, were there at the same time. We talk again. She mentions she has books she would want me to have. This coming from a lady, obsessed with her books, and kept them like her children. I told her I would gladly take them. (Oops, stranger danger coming up) She gave me her cell phone number, and told me to text her whenever I was going to Barnes and Noble. So I did. She showed up once, and brought me over a dozen books, from her collection. I thought that was amazing. She had probably talked to me a handful of times, and we had made a deep enough connection for her to give me some of her favorite books ever? Incredible. I still see Barbette sometimes. And I often wonder where she is, or if she's doing okay.
      So, the point to that story, is the fact that I wouldn't have been able to make that connection if I was sitting at home, just downloading books all the time. Not experiencing all of the acts that go into real book hunting, and buying. I love the digital age, but leave books like they are. Books change people. But experiences surrounding books, and where they are kept in palpable places, can change you more.

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    2. Okay, this post is a favorite, because I LOVE how you are illustrating that when we put our technology down, we make REAL connections that are life changing and truly meaningful. It goes way beyond books--this applies to everything in our lives in this crazy, chaotic, 21st century in which we live. I hope Barbette is doing well, too, and how amazing that from sharing your time with someone, you ended up with some beautiful literature! That brings beautiful even closer and, dare I say, leaves a legacy. :)

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  29. Part of me wishes that I had Nooks and digital books when I was younger. The other part savors the authenticity of actually, physically flipping a page and not staring at a screen for multiple hours a day. I think that Sandra Boynton and Loud Crow did an amazing job on bringing her book to life through the digital world. The app was made to be appeasing to children and is very intriguing. The app enhances the reading experience, because it is a game. Which brings me to my second point. Our society is undoubtedly becoming more and more like slaves to our devices. My childhood consisted of playing outside in my backyard and using my imagination all day. However, my younger brothers spend most of their free-time watching TV and playing on their tablets. So, its obvious this addiction to screens is getting worse. "It's all a new world," Boynton states and it couldn't be truer. Our society is becoming less and less active and more secluded. We like easy, simple, clear and I fear that apps like Loud Crow's is causing a decrease in brain activity in children, because it has turned reading into a game and no longer a critical thinking skill.

    However, digital resources are not always the bad guy. They can be used to enhance your understanding of literature through communication. Amy Ewing had a wonderful point. Twitter, Facebook, etc. is a very efficient way to communicate with others you do not necessarily know to discuss the book. But, then again, word of mouth is so much more affective than media because its on a personal level. I am relieved to see that people affect people more than media affects people.

    Personally, I would much rather read a physical text because it hold my concentration longer. I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that when we are actually holding a book, more than one of our sense connect. Instead of just seeing we are feeling.

    I don't think its right to give an absolute answer on whether or not digital texts and such are good or bad. It depends on the situation. But more than anything, I think it depends on moderation. How much time are we spending looking at a screen daily? The digital world is amazing and can be extremely beneficial, but we were not made to be robots.

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    1. Amen, for moderation! Can I hear an Amen? I love what you said about how we used to see kids out playing "until the street lights came in." It wasn't really a weekend unless I got muddy, a scraped knee, and played at least two rounds of capture the flag ALL over the neighborhood and Central Park in Huntington Beach (super great place for Capture the flag, by the way--lots of dense trees, hills, and two ponds!) Now, kids have to be forced to go play outside. :( You are absolutely right though: just like "guns don't kill people, people do," technology doesn't cuff us to the couch and make us keep staring or playing or texting. It takes responsible "training," and, as you said, the art of practicing moderation.

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  30. This video disgusted me. As mentioned earlier in the week in the technology video, we are becoming slaves to the technology we create. I have always had a deep love for reading. I spent a lot of my childhood in libraries, crowding my fridge with library receipts so I wouldn't forget when they were due. The feeling of reading takes me to another world. A world I much prefer over reality. I like the feeling of gripping the pages when the author creates tension, or using a ratty highlighter to mark up the text. Don't get me wrong, I love our digital day and age. I love the simplicity of just asking my iphone questions and getting answers. But here is the catch. I spend all day in front of a screen. The way I see it, reading is my escape, so how can I escape through another damn screen? I want to feel the smooth paperback, and breathe in that new book smell. I have experienced reading an ebook before, and I hated it. It's so tiresome to your eyes. And I see no fun or satisfaction if you cannot see the bookmark moving back closer and closer towards the back of the book. Our world is being reshaped and changing so rapidly, it breaks my heart to see something so traditional, ancient, and intellectual fade. Though the idea of theater and literature meshed together into an app sounds appealing to a young child, I feel as though it weakens the brain. Where is the imagination in that? How can any imagery be created solely? As a reader, I like to build connections, I feel everyone imagined story line situations a different way. And that's what build a connection and further understanding. I don't see that happening through a screen that does the imagining for you. Reading and books are a unique beautiful art. I don't care if our technology is advancing into an era where wee are becoming idiots, smart phones, and dumb people. Reading and the art works of books should be preserved.

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    1. You sound like a younger and prettier version of me. ;) I agree in my heart with everything you said. This tells me that perhaps, you are a Romantic (meaning the philosophy) at heart. I agree about the experience of REAL reading and the library. Nothing can replace that, and sadly, many of our younger ones will never know that privilege...and that really is what it was. May sound silly, but I remember fondly when I was in high school, the weekend before the AP English exam, sitting cross-legged on the floor of the Huntington Beach Library (second floor-classics section) in my Drill Team sweats (fresh from practice) with two of my friends, a pile of books that "may be on the test" and their corresponding Cliff notes, reading and taking notes, and dare I say, enjoying the stress of youth together, surrounded by books. It was so much better than staring at a screen, alone, telling myself doomsday was coming. We spent a day at the library talking, arguing and laughing about literature! *sigh* Those were the days...
      I love what you said about the app, too. I love the theater, don't get me wrong. My parents took me to live theater all the time in LA, as they had season tickets at the Ahmanson, Schubert and Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. But I guess I like to keep theater on the stage (real) and books on the page (also real).
      Well, Clarissa, I guess great minds think alike. :)

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  31. As a reader of many books, in both ebook and standard publications, I have seen the good and bad sides of both new technology and classic books. Electronic readers such as the nook or the Kindle have many advantages over real books, being lighter and smaller. Regular books however, are normally easier to read, and truly make you feel immersed into a book, with the smell of the book and the feel of the pages. I love real books, I love going to garage sales and clearing out their shelves to add to my own collection. I love that sharing aspect that I know someone cared enough about this book to not just trash it or let it go to waste. You can even find classic or even rare editions at garage sales if you are lucky. I also have read about one hundred books on my fathers kindle, many of which had just caught our eyes as we had been scrolling through the new releases section or even just looking at suggestions Amazon gave us. I have found more connections that I would have never found if I hadn't been a fan of both. The ebook industry really lets new authors bloom and develop without having to fear all the major deadlines if they had went to a major publisher to get their story into print. If a book is very good, I will sometimes see if I can buy it somewhere online and have an actual copy of it in my house, as I love sharing books with my friends. I shared books with Chase because of our love of Science fiction, and my sister still has my hardcover set of A Ice And Fire sitting around her apartment for when she has a rainy day. In all actuality, the only difference between an ebook and a regular book, is what you make of it. Do you feel that reading books is old fashioned and prefer to have as many options to read in the most convenient way possible at your fingertips? Then you can use ebooks and not interfere with the people who love that feeling of holding on to a book, sometimes clinging to it as if it was a lifeline during emotional parts of the books. I love reading in all forms, some of the best things I have ever seen written were not even actually published at all, just a little story someone wrote in their spare time or even a diary of an uncle who died a while back or a note from a fling that brings back a smile when things look dark and gloomy. Reading things other people put their hearts and souls into, be it poetry, fiction, a memoir, a horror story or even fan fiction and translated works from other cultures is important. Be it online, in a bookstore, or even just a little poem from a girl in class, cherish everything you read as it establishes a connection between yourself and the author, who cared enough about it to put it into words. There is no practical difference in any writing, be it electronic or paper, published or unpublished. The only difference is what you make of it.

    Words are important, they all have weight, they can sway a nation or set your path straight. No matter where you find it, be it grandstand or bookstore, a smile on your face is what the author lives for. So next time she hands you a little note, to show how much she cares, or he hands you his journal, knowing you'd benefit from his share. So enjoy what you read, even if the author can't sing, as you'll find what you need, in the joy that it brings.

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    1. Okay, you are forgiven for being late with your post, Josh. AWESOME. Loved the last poem, too. I am pleasantly surprised to hear that you shop garage sales for books, and that you are happy to see that they are being recycled and shared rather than trashed. I actually found a very rare edition of Robin Hood at a garage sale. I think I paid 50 cents, and discovered it was worth more like $50! A Kindle cannot give that satisfaction of touching a piece of history-literally and figuratively-in your hand. But you are right about technology having an important place. I know that it does, and I would be a total hypocrite if I said I wanted it to go away, and just return to the past.

      I worry about the written word in hard copy, yet I am thrilled to post to a blog or word process my own creative stories. I need technology. I enjoy it. But...I do wonder from time to time: would I have the imagination and love for thinking up characters, researching past times, and creating stories if I grew up in an "app book culture?" Something to think about, I guess. Anyway, thoroughly enjoyed your post. :)

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  32. I have always read vintage books, and have only once read an ebook, but just by looking at technology now and where it's heading it is easy to see that there will soon be less and less vintage books being made. Ebooks are perfect for those who just want to read a story, enjoy it, and be done with it, but for the avid reader that keeps connections to all the books that they have read they will always have vintage. Now ebooks are starting to become the majority of books being read, because when weighing in all the factors they are simple just easier in almost every way. The sad part is this it is making it hard for those publishers that are trying to make money by getting more books published, creating a downside to the growing use of ebooks

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  33. Many people don't like reading a books on an electronic. I actually don't mind reading on an electronic. Yes I also like reading a regular paperback book but I also don't mind reading an ebook. I actually read The Fault in Our Stars on a Kindle and I loved it! It didn't bother me that I was reading it off a screen. With a regular book you are able to see if you are close to the ending and that distracts me a little bit. But I also read other books by John Green the regular standard paperback way and I still enjoyed them. I think both have pros and cons to them. If the book is too thick or if you want to carry around a lot of books then a kindle is great for that because it can hold all those books and it is really thin and easy to carry around. But a con to reading books on a kindle is that it might hurt people's eyes for staring at a screen too long. If someone had a long day at work or at school just from staring at their laptop, they would like to get home and relax by reading a standard book. Not by going home and staring at a screen again. When I was younger, I lived close to a library. My mom would drive me every week so that I could check out books. I always loved walking into the library and looking at all the books they had. I liked checking out a couple books and using the receipt as my bookmark just so I know when I had to return the book. When I read I like to get lost in the book and really involve myself with the characters. Something about holding the actual book helps to that. But I don't prefer one over the other.

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  34. As the world becomes more technologically advanced, so does the way people read books. Think of way before there were ebooks were around, and there were just good old books. Now jump into the future when audio books were released. This was before computers were invented and people had big old boom boxes, as they were called. Now, however there is the Kindle. This device allows you to read and store multiple books on one inch, or less thick device. You can read books in the sunlight without having to squint or put your face close up to the book. And when you go on a road trip, half your car doesn't need to be filled with "reading material". I personally feel that yes, books are losing their power, but also I feel reading in general is just dying off. When parents do get kids into a bookstore, what do they look at? The comic books, tablets, or even the toys that for some reason they have in a bookstore. And in middle school, when we used to go to a book fair, if anyone knows what that is, kids were much more interested in the pencils and posters rather than books. Oh, and what's a library? I feel that technology is actually keeping reading, and books alive in this new world. The ebooks are just the new way of reading and without them there would be very little readers in the world. When someone nowadays looks at a thick book they think, "No way that is way to big for me to read". With the ebook it takes out that distraction, and the book has a better chance of getting the reader to fall in love with it. Without the internet, or electronic books, people would feel not as likely to read. Well, I guess then without the internet people would read books more often. With travel, jobs, and entertainment being technologically upgraded, books need to be to in order to stay in business.

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  35. I feel as though technology only has the power to hinder the experience of reading an actual book if one would allow it to. While there are advantages to both ends of literature, be it vintage and personal or electronic and convenient, there are also downsides. Ebooks have the potential of attracting a larger audience, simply because people have the ability to sample a lot more material as well as get their hands on it almost instantaneously. It's a lot easier to purchase a digital book on your iPhone or Kindle instead of driving to the bookstore to purchase the same material. However -- let's look at it from a different perspective. Buying an ebook takes away that social interaction, that social perception -- the connection human beings typically maintain on a regular basis in everyday routines. Also, there is a lack of conviction towards literature itself. There is a certain feeling you get when you're able to smell the print, turn each crisp page. It allows you to connect with books on a deeper level, to conceptualize all the major notions the author wanted you to perceive as well as have that suspense you get when you wait to turn the pages. Physical books have a different meaning and feeling to them. Yes, electronic print is convenient to those constantly on the run but it distracts you from the total atmosphere of the book as a whole. I think it's all dependent on the reader as well, because some prefer having no restrictions and being able to view all types of literature at the push of a button, and other people really like the idea of sitting down by the edge of the pool or in the middle of a park with the book they just got at Barnes & Noble.

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    1. I am so glad to hear that this new generation of readers feels this way about print. :) It does my heart very well! I so agree with you though and the points you made about digital books. Sometimes, that ability to sample first, and then just buy a book (when you're home, in your pjs, enjoying at rest) with the click of a button is VERY tempting, and worth the compromise. I guess, I too agree that it is good to have both options....as long as we get to keep both!

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  36. I think the relationship between technology and literature depends on the person. Some may use technology as a means to discover literature. Others may have a disdain for technology and prefer only hard copies of text. Still more people may discard physical literature completely in favor of reading online. They can help each other by technology making literature easier to access for some audiences. On the other hand, people may develop a preference for reading informal texts online rather than a full length book. It’s easier, in my opinion, to jump between short articles than to sit and read a full length, complex text.

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  37. Reading a book from paper is a great experience, and I thoroughly enjoy it. Although I am a advocate of technology, I hate reading off of tablets and such. In order to get the actual feel of the book, I have to read it from paper and not from a ghost of a book. I do love how cheap amazon can make the books on the kindle, and although I am able to read a lot more with the lower prices, it loses something. I have no problem reading emails or articles on a computer or tablet, but when I have to read an entire book, I just cannot do so if I do not have the paper copy. As a kid I always had books as actual books. Now with the ability to make the decision between the cheaper novels on the kindle and actual books, I often find myself unable to pick the cheaper alternative. I love technology, but will pick real books every time.

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